Association Between Birthweight and Cognitive Function in Middle Age: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

Antonio José Leal Costa, Pauline Lorena Kale, Ronir Raggio Luiz, Suzana Alves De Moraes, Thomas H. Mosley, Moyses Szklo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: We aimed to examine the relationship of birthweight to cognitive performance in middle aged participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC). Methods: Cognitive function, assessed by means of three neuropsychological tests-the Delayed Word Recall Test (DWR), the Digit Symbol Subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (DSS/WAIS-R), and the Word Fluency (WF) Test, was evaluated in relation to birthweight, as recalled through standardized interviews, by the use of data from the second and fourth follow-up visits of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study cohort (1990-1992 and 1996-1998, respectively). Overall, 6785 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. Results: After adjusting for adult sociodemographic factors, childhood socioeconomic environment and parental risk factors, and adult anthropometric, health status-related. and behavioral variables, we observed linear trends for the relationship of birthweight to WF scores, although the trend was statistically significant only for those reporting exact birthweights (p for trend = .004). For the other cognitive test results, results were either null or inconsistent with the a priori hypotheses. Conclusions: Except for WF in those reporting exact birthweights, our study does not support the notion that birthweight influences cognitive function in adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)851-856
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Fingerprint

Cognition
Atherosclerosis
Neuropsychological Tests
Intelligence
Health Status
Cohort Studies
Interviews

Keywords

  • Birthweight
  • Cognition Disorders
  • Cohort Studies
  • Fetal Programming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Association Between Birthweight and Cognitive Function in Middle Age : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. / Costa, Antonio José Leal; Kale, Pauline Lorena; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; De Moraes, Suzana Alves; Mosley, Thomas H.; Szklo, Moyses.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 21, No. 11, 11.2011, p. 851-856.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Costa, Antonio José Leal ; Kale, Pauline Lorena ; Luiz, Ronir Raggio ; De Moraes, Suzana Alves ; Mosley, Thomas H. ; Szklo, Moyses. / Association Between Birthweight and Cognitive Function in Middle Age : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. In: Annals of Epidemiology. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 11. pp. 851-856.
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