Association between allostatic load and health behaviours

A latent class approach

Sarah N. Forrester, Jeannie-Marie S Leoutsakos, Joseph J Gallo, Roland J Thorpe, Teresa E. Seeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Allostatic load (AL) has been characterised in many ways throughout the literature; however, its relationship to health behaviours has only been studied in limited populations. We aimed to uncover qualitative patterns of biological indicators in AL and determine if those patterns were associated with certain health behaviours. Methods: We conducted latent class analysis using biological indicators from a multiethnic population. We fit latent class regression of class on health behaviours (smoking, poor diet, physical activity and alcohol use) to measure the association between each latent class of AL and each health behaviour. Results: Four classes, Metabolic+Cholesterol, Blood Pressure', Metabolic+Blood Pressure' and Low', were found in the sample. Latent class regression showed that physical activity and alcohol use were significantly associated with the Metabolic+Blood Pressure' class. Conclusion: Less physical activity was required to improve AL than was previously found. Low to moderate alcohol use was beneficial for lower AL. Implications of the amount of physical activity necessary to lower AL is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Allostasis
Health Behavior
Alcohols
Blood Pressure
Hypotension
Population
Smoking
Cholesterol
Diet

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • clusters
  • diet
  • exercise
  • health behaviour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Association between allostatic load and health behaviours: A latent class approach",
abstract = "Background: Allostatic load (AL) has been characterised in many ways throughout the literature; however, its relationship to health behaviours has only been studied in limited populations. We aimed to uncover qualitative patterns of biological indicators in AL and determine if those patterns were associated with certain health behaviours. Methods: We conducted latent class analysis using biological indicators from a multiethnic population. We fit latent class regression of class on health behaviours (smoking, poor diet, physical activity and alcohol use) to measure the association between each latent class of AL and each health behaviour. Results: Four classes, Metabolic+Cholesterol, Blood Pressure', Metabolic+Blood Pressure' and Low', were found in the sample. Latent class regression showed that physical activity and alcohol use were significantly associated with the Metabolic+Blood Pressure' class. Conclusion: Less physical activity was required to improve AL than was previously found. Low to moderate alcohol use was beneficial for lower AL. Implications of the amount of physical activity necessary to lower AL is discussed.",
keywords = "blood pressure, clusters, diet, exercise, health behaviour",
author = "Forrester, {Sarah N.} and Leoutsakos, {Jeannie-Marie S} and Gallo, {Joseph J} and Thorpe, {Roland J} and Seeman, {Teresa E.}",
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AU - Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S

AU - Gallo, Joseph J

AU - Thorpe, Roland J

AU - Seeman, Teresa E.

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N2 - Background: Allostatic load (AL) has been characterised in many ways throughout the literature; however, its relationship to health behaviours has only been studied in limited populations. We aimed to uncover qualitative patterns of biological indicators in AL and determine if those patterns were associated with certain health behaviours. Methods: We conducted latent class analysis using biological indicators from a multiethnic population. We fit latent class regression of class on health behaviours (smoking, poor diet, physical activity and alcohol use) to measure the association between each latent class of AL and each health behaviour. Results: Four classes, Metabolic+Cholesterol, Blood Pressure', Metabolic+Blood Pressure' and Low', were found in the sample. Latent class regression showed that physical activity and alcohol use were significantly associated with the Metabolic+Blood Pressure' class. Conclusion: Less physical activity was required to improve AL than was previously found. Low to moderate alcohol use was beneficial for lower AL. Implications of the amount of physical activity necessary to lower AL is discussed.

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