Assessment of the influence of irrelevant IgE on allergic sensitivity to two independent allergens

R. Robert Schellenberg, N Franklin Adkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Serum samples from 31 patients sensitive to both ragweed and rye grass were quantitated for IgE specific for ragweed antigen E (AgE) and rye grass group I (rye I) antigens employing the previously described radioallergosorbent test (RAST) elution technique. IgE anti-AgE ranged from 0.4 to 320 ng/ml and comprised 0.4% to 14.2% of total serum IgE. The same sera contained IgE anti-rye I ranging from 7.9 to 1,168 ng/ml, comprising 1.6% to 29.6% of total serum IgE. A new theoretical parameter (RF), representing the percent of total IgE-Fc receptors of target cells occupied by allergen-specific IgE, was calculated for each IgE specificity by using the determinations of allergen-specific IgE antibody, total serum IgE, and assuming an equilibrium constant for binding of IgE molecules to basophils of 109M-1. This "% occupancy" parameter correlated with skin test titration, basophil cell sensitivity, and hay fever symptom scores as well as, but not better than, the absolute values of allergen-specific IgE. This finding suggests that in most atopic patients, the quantity of irrelevant IgE plays a relatively minor role in determining allergic sensitivity to a given allergen. The implications of this finding are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-22
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979

Fingerprint

Allergens
Immunoglobulin E
Lolium
Serum
Basophils
Radioallergosorbent Test
Ambrosia
IgE Receptors
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Fc Receptors
Skin Tests
Antigens
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Assessment of the influence of irrelevant IgE on allergic sensitivity to two independent allergens. / Schellenberg, R. Robert; Adkinson, N Franklin.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 63, No. 1, 1979, p. 15-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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