Assessment of the impact of quality improvement interventions on the quality of sick child care provided by Health Extension Workers in Ethiopia

Nathan P. Miller, Agbessi Amouzou, Elizabeth Hazel, Hailemariam Legesse, Tedbabe Degefie, Mengistu Tafesse, Robert E Black, Jennifer Bryce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Ethiopia has scaled up integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM), including several interventions to improve the performance of Health Extension Workers (HEWs). We assessed associations between interventions to improve iCCM quality of care and the observed quality of care among HEWs. Methods We assessed iCCM implementation strength and quality of care provided by HEWs in Ethiopia. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations between interventions to improve iCCM quality of care and correct management of iCCM illnesses. Findings Children who were managed by an HEW who had attended a performance review and clinical mentoring meeting (PRCMM) had 8.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.34-29.51) times the odds of being correctly managed, compared to children managed by an HEW who did not attend a PRCMM. Management by an HEW who received follow-up training also significantly increased the odds of correct management (odds ratio (OR) = 2.09, 95% CI 1.05-4.18). Supervision on iCCM (OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.23-1.72) did not significantly affect the odds of receiving correct care. Conclusions These results suggest PRCMM and follow-up training were effective interventions, while implementation of supportive supervision needs to be reviewed to improve impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number020404
JournalJournal of Global Health
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Assessment of the impact of quality improvement interventions on the quality of sick child care provided by Health Extension Workers in Ethiopia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this