Assessment of measuring circulating levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-8, C-reactive protein, soluble Fcγ receptor type III, and Mannose-binding protein in febrile children with cancer and neutropenia

Th Lehrnbecher, D. Venzon, M. De Haas, S. J. Chanock, J. Kühl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Circulating levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, soluble Fcγ receptor type III (sFcγRIII), mannose-binding protein (MBP), and C-reactive protein (CrP) were assessed among febrile children with cancer and neutropenia. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, sFcγRIII, MBP, and CrP were measured in serum from 56 pediatric cancer patients at the time of admission for 121 episodes of febrile neutropenia (88 febrile episodes without identifiable source, 5 clinically documented infections, 20 episodes of bacteremia due to gram- positive and 5 due to gram-negative organisms, and 3 fungal infections). IL- 6 and IL-8 levels were higher in patients with either bacteremia due to gram- negative organisms or fungal infections than in patients with febrile episodes without an identifiable source (P < .00001 for each). IL-6 and IL-8 levels were higher in children with bacteremia due to gram-negative organisms than in those with bacteremia due to gram-positive organisms (P = .0011 and P = .0003, respectively). The measured levels of CrP, MBP, and sFcγRIII were not useful for identifying the type of infection. These preliminary results show the potential usefulness of IL-6 and IL-8 as early indicators for life- threatening infections in febrile cancer patients with neutropenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)414-419
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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