Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population

Eva Oakkar, Beth Hopping, L. Beck, T. Sheehy, E. De Roose, S. Sharma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Traditional foods are rich sources of essential nutrients, but Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, have been undergoing a nutrition transition, characterised by an increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense foods. The present study aimed to characterise energy, nutrient and food intakes amongst adult Inuvialuit. Methods: The study collected up to three 24-h dietary recalls on nonconsecutive days for each participant in spring/summer of 2008 in one remote community in the NWT. Recall data were analysed for energy and nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, most commonly reported foods, and food contributors to energy and nutrients. Results: Participants included 14 men and 50 women (response rate 79%). Median daily energy intake was 9.4 (interquartile range = 5.7) MJ for men and 8.3 (3.6) MJ for women. The majority of adult Inuvialuit did not meet the recommendation for vitamins A [median intake = 344.7 (246.3) μg-RAE in men, 248.9 (213.8) μg-RAE in women], B6 [0.9 (0.8) mg in men, 1.0 (0.5) mg in women] and E [2.4 (2.1) mg in men, 1.8 (1.0) mg in women], dietary fibre [7.7 (5.7) g in men, 8.7 (4.4) g in women], calcium [779.6 (842.0) mg in men, 610.4 (431.5) mg in women] and total folate [222.6 (57.7) μg in men, 264.6 (127.5) μg in women]. Vitamin D intake was below the recommendation for most women [median intake = 100.0 (119.2) IU]. Traditional foods contributed substantially to protein and iron intake. Juices were the main contributors to energy, carbohydrate and calcium. Conclusions: The present study revealed an inadequate consumption of essential nutrients in an Inuvialuit population. If these nutrient deficiencies continue, this population will face an increased burden of chronic diseases and malnutrition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-42
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume23
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Food
Population
Northwest Territories
Energy Intake
Calcium
Dietary Fiber
Vitamin A
Folic Acid
Vitamin D
Malnutrition
Canada
Chronic Disease
Iron
Eating
Carbohydrates
Proteins

Keywords

  • 24-h recalls
  • Dietary adequacy
  • Inuvialuit
  • Nutrients
  • Traditional foods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Oakkar, E., Hopping, B., Beck, L., Sheehy, T., De Roose, E., & Sharma, S. (2010). Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 23(SUPPL. 1), 35-42. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-277X.2010.01098.x

Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population. / Oakkar, Eva; Hopping, Beth; Beck, L.; Sheehy, T.; De Roose, E.; Sharma, S.

In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 23, No. SUPPL. 1, 10.2010, p. 35-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oakkar, E, Hopping, B, Beck, L, Sheehy, T, De Roose, E & Sharma, S 2010, 'Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 23, no. SUPPL. 1, pp. 35-42. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-277X.2010.01098.x
Oakkar, Eva ; Hopping, Beth ; Beck, L. ; Sheehy, T. ; De Roose, E. ; Sharma, S. / Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population. In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 2010 ; Vol. 23, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 35-42.
@article{36e925a5f1034561ab5fb8756360dad9,
title = "Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population",
abstract = "Background: Traditional foods are rich sources of essential nutrients, but Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, have been undergoing a nutrition transition, characterised by an increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense foods. The present study aimed to characterise energy, nutrient and food intakes amongst adult Inuvialuit. Methods: The study collected up to three 24-h dietary recalls on nonconsecutive days for each participant in spring/summer of 2008 in one remote community in the NWT. Recall data were analysed for energy and nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, most commonly reported foods, and food contributors to energy and nutrients. Results: Participants included 14 men and 50 women (response rate 79{\%}). Median daily energy intake was 9.4 (interquartile range = 5.7) MJ for men and 8.3 (3.6) MJ for women. The majority of adult Inuvialuit did not meet the recommendation for vitamins A [median intake = 344.7 (246.3) μg-RAE in men, 248.9 (213.8) μg-RAE in women], B6 [0.9 (0.8) mg in men, 1.0 (0.5) mg in women] and E [2.4 (2.1) mg in men, 1.8 (1.0) mg in women], dietary fibre [7.7 (5.7) g in men, 8.7 (4.4) g in women], calcium [779.6 (842.0) mg in men, 610.4 (431.5) mg in women] and total folate [222.6 (57.7) μg in men, 264.6 (127.5) μg in women]. Vitamin D intake was below the recommendation for most women [median intake = 100.0 (119.2) IU]. Traditional foods contributed substantially to protein and iron intake. Juices were the main contributors to energy, carbohydrate and calcium. Conclusions: The present study revealed an inadequate consumption of essential nutrients in an Inuvialuit population. If these nutrient deficiencies continue, this population will face an increased burden of chronic diseases and malnutrition.",
keywords = "24-h recalls, Dietary adequacy, Inuvialuit, Nutrients, Traditional foods",
author = "Eva Oakkar and Beth Hopping and L. Beck and T. Sheehy and {De Roose}, E. and S. Sharma",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-277X.2010.01098.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "35--42",
journal = "Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics",
issn = "0952-3871",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population

AU - Oakkar, Eva

AU - Hopping, Beth

AU - Beck, L.

AU - Sheehy, T.

AU - De Roose, E.

AU - Sharma, S.

PY - 2010/10

Y1 - 2010/10

N2 - Background: Traditional foods are rich sources of essential nutrients, but Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, have been undergoing a nutrition transition, characterised by an increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense foods. The present study aimed to characterise energy, nutrient and food intakes amongst adult Inuvialuit. Methods: The study collected up to three 24-h dietary recalls on nonconsecutive days for each participant in spring/summer of 2008 in one remote community in the NWT. Recall data were analysed for energy and nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, most commonly reported foods, and food contributors to energy and nutrients. Results: Participants included 14 men and 50 women (response rate 79%). Median daily energy intake was 9.4 (interquartile range = 5.7) MJ for men and 8.3 (3.6) MJ for women. The majority of adult Inuvialuit did not meet the recommendation for vitamins A [median intake = 344.7 (246.3) μg-RAE in men, 248.9 (213.8) μg-RAE in women], B6 [0.9 (0.8) mg in men, 1.0 (0.5) mg in women] and E [2.4 (2.1) mg in men, 1.8 (1.0) mg in women], dietary fibre [7.7 (5.7) g in men, 8.7 (4.4) g in women], calcium [779.6 (842.0) mg in men, 610.4 (431.5) mg in women] and total folate [222.6 (57.7) μg in men, 264.6 (127.5) μg in women]. Vitamin D intake was below the recommendation for most women [median intake = 100.0 (119.2) IU]. Traditional foods contributed substantially to protein and iron intake. Juices were the main contributors to energy, carbohydrate and calcium. Conclusions: The present study revealed an inadequate consumption of essential nutrients in an Inuvialuit population. If these nutrient deficiencies continue, this population will face an increased burden of chronic diseases and malnutrition.

AB - Background: Traditional foods are rich sources of essential nutrients, but Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, have been undergoing a nutrition transition, characterised by an increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense foods. The present study aimed to characterise energy, nutrient and food intakes amongst adult Inuvialuit. Methods: The study collected up to three 24-h dietary recalls on nonconsecutive days for each participant in spring/summer of 2008 in one remote community in the NWT. Recall data were analysed for energy and nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, most commonly reported foods, and food contributors to energy and nutrients. Results: Participants included 14 men and 50 women (response rate 79%). Median daily energy intake was 9.4 (interquartile range = 5.7) MJ for men and 8.3 (3.6) MJ for women. The majority of adult Inuvialuit did not meet the recommendation for vitamins A [median intake = 344.7 (246.3) μg-RAE in men, 248.9 (213.8) μg-RAE in women], B6 [0.9 (0.8) mg in men, 1.0 (0.5) mg in women] and E [2.4 (2.1) mg in men, 1.8 (1.0) mg in women], dietary fibre [7.7 (5.7) g in men, 8.7 (4.4) g in women], calcium [779.6 (842.0) mg in men, 610.4 (431.5) mg in women] and total folate [222.6 (57.7) μg in men, 264.6 (127.5) μg in women]. Vitamin D intake was below the recommendation for most women [median intake = 100.0 (119.2) IU]. Traditional foods contributed substantially to protein and iron intake. Juices were the main contributors to energy, carbohydrate and calcium. Conclusions: The present study revealed an inadequate consumption of essential nutrients in an Inuvialuit population. If these nutrient deficiencies continue, this population will face an increased burden of chronic diseases and malnutrition.

KW - 24-h recalls

KW - Dietary adequacy

KW - Inuvialuit

KW - Nutrients

KW - Traditional foods

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956493192&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956493192&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-277X.2010.01098.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-277X.2010.01098.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21158960

AN - SCOPUS:77956493192

VL - 23

SP - 35

EP - 42

JO - Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

JF - Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

SN - 0952-3871

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -