Assessment of an aerosol treatment to improve air quality in a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO)

Ana M Rule, Amy R. Chapin, Sheila A. McCarthy, Kristen E. Gibson, Kellogg Schwab, Timothy J. Buckley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Poor air quality within swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) poses a threat to workers, the surrounding community, and farm production. Accordingly, the current study was conducted to evaluate a technology for reducing air pollution including paniculate matter (PM), viable bacteria, and ammonia within such a facility. The technology consists of an acid-oil-alcohol aerosol applied daily. Its effectiveness was evaluated by comparing air quality from before to after treatment and between treated and untreated sides of a barn separated by an impervious partition. On the untreated side, air quality was typical for a swine CAFO, with mean PM2.5 of 0.28 mg/m3 and PMTOT of 1.5 mg/m3. The treatment yielded a reduction in PM concentration of 75-90% from before to after treatment. Effectiveness increased with time, application, and particle size (40% reduction for 1 μm and 90% for >10 μm). Airborne bacteria levels (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, and gram-positive cocci) decreased one logarithmic unit after treatment. In contrast, treatment had no effect on ammonia concentrations. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of an intervention in yielding exposure and emission reductions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9649-9655
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume39
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2005

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Aerosols
Air quality
Bacteria
air quality
Animals
aerosol
Ammonia
bacterium
animal
ammonia
Air pollution
Farms
alcohol
Oils
Alcohols
atmospheric pollution
Particle size
particle size
farm
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Assessment of an aerosol treatment to improve air quality in a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO). / Rule, Ana M; Chapin, Amy R.; McCarthy, Sheila A.; Gibson, Kristen E.; Schwab, Kellogg; Buckley, Timothy J.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 39, No. 24, 15.12.2005, p. 9649-9655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rule, Ana M ; Chapin, Amy R. ; McCarthy, Sheila A. ; Gibson, Kristen E. ; Schwab, Kellogg ; Buckley, Timothy J. / Assessment of an aerosol treatment to improve air quality in a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO). In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2005 ; Vol. 39, No. 24. pp. 9649-9655.
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