Assessing the impact of micronutrient intervention programs implemented under special circumstances- Meeting report

Saskia De Pee, Paul Spiegel, Klaus Kraemer, Caroline Wilkinson, Oleg Bilukha, Andrew Seal, Kathy Macias, Allison Oman, Ahmed Baba Fall, Ray Yip, Juan Pablo Peña-Rosas, Keith West, Stanley Zlotkin, Martin Bloem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction and Objective. The World Food Programme and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees organized a meeting of experts to discuss evaluation of micronutrient interventions under special circumstances, such as emergency and refugee situations. Results. Multimicronutrient interventions for groups with higher needs may include home fortification products for young children or supplements for pregnant and lactating women. The choice of preparation should be guided by target group needs, evidence of efficacy of a product or its compounds, acceptability, and costeffectiveness. Different designs can be used to assess whether an intervention has the desired impact. First, program implementation and adherence must be ascertained. Then, impact on micronutrient status can be assessed, but design options are often limited by logistic challenges, available budget, security issues, and ethical and practical issues regarding nonintervention or placebo groups. Under these conditions, a plausibility design using pre- and postintervention cross-sectional surveys, a prospective cohort study, or a step-wedge design, which enrolls groups as they start receiving the intervention, should be considered. Post hoc comparison of groups with different adherence levels may also be useful. Hemoglobin is often selected as an impact indicator because it is easily measured and tends to respond to change in micronutrient status, especially iron. However, it is not a very specific indicator of micronutrient status, because it is also influenced by inflammation, parasitic infestation, physiological status (age, pregnancy), altitude, and disorders such as thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Conclusion. Given the constraints described above, replicability of impact in different contexts is key to the validation of micronutrient interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-263
Number of pages8
JournalFood and Nutrition Bulletin
Volume32
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Micronutrients
dietary minerals
trace element
refugee
Group
thalassemia
sickle cell anemia
lactating women
UNHCR
Refugees
Thalassemia
United Nations
food and nutrition programs
target group
Sickle Cell Anemia
Budgets
pregnant women
hemoglobin
parasitoses
physiological state

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Hemoglobin
  • Impact assessment
  • Lipid-based nutrient supplement
  • Micronutrient powder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Food Science

Cite this

Assessing the impact of micronutrient intervention programs implemented under special circumstances- Meeting report. / De Pee, Saskia; Spiegel, Paul; Kraemer, Klaus; Wilkinson, Caroline; Bilukha, Oleg; Seal, Andrew; Macias, Kathy; Oman, Allison; Fall, Ahmed Baba; Yip, Ray; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; West, Keith; Zlotkin, Stanley; Bloem, Martin.

In: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Vol. 32, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 256-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Pee, S, Spiegel, P, Kraemer, K, Wilkinson, C, Bilukha, O, Seal, A, Macias, K, Oman, A, Fall, AB, Yip, R, Peña-Rosas, JP, West, K, Zlotkin, S & Bloem, M 2011, 'Assessing the impact of micronutrient intervention programs implemented under special circumstances- Meeting report', Food and Nutrition Bulletin, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 256-263.
De Pee, Saskia ; Spiegel, Paul ; Kraemer, Klaus ; Wilkinson, Caroline ; Bilukha, Oleg ; Seal, Andrew ; Macias, Kathy ; Oman, Allison ; Fall, Ahmed Baba ; Yip, Ray ; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo ; West, Keith ; Zlotkin, Stanley ; Bloem, Martin. / Assessing the impact of micronutrient intervention programs implemented under special circumstances- Meeting report. In: Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 256-263.
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