Assessing Change in Dietary-Fat Behaviors in a Weight-Loss Program for African Americans: A Potential Short Method

Cheryl A M Anderson, Shiriki K. Kumanyika, Justine Shults, Michael J. Kallan, Kim M. Gans, Patricia M. Risica

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Change in dietary-fat behaviors was assessed in 95 African-American women in a culturally adapted weight-management program using the SisterTalk Food Habits Questionnaire. The hypothesis was that there would be no practical difference in ability to track dietary-fat behaviors related to weight change when using only 30 items from the SisterTalk Food Habits Questionnaire (about fat consumption frequency) compared to using all 91 items from the SisterTalk Food Habits Questionnaire (30 items plus additional details about behaviors). SisterTalk Food Habits Questionnaire responses use a scale of 1 to 4; higher numbers imply higher fat consumption. After an average of 18 months (n=49), a pre- to postintervention decrease in SisterTalk Food Habits Questionnaire score was observed using 91 items (-0.35) or 30 items (-0.28) (both P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)838-842
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume107
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

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