Assessing burden of central line–associated bloodstream infections present on hospital admission

Hannah Leeman, Sara Cosgrove, Deborah Williams, Sara Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Few data exist on the incidence of central line–associated bloodstream infection present on hospital admission (CLABSI-POA), although the practice of patients maintaining central lines outside of hospitals is increasing. We describe patients presenting to an academic medical center with CLABSI-POA over 1 year. Of the 130 admissions, half presented from home infusion (47%), followed by oncology clinic (22%), hemodialysis (14%), and skilled nursing facility (8%). Efforts to reduce CLABSIs should address patients across the entire health care system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Infection
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Renal Dialysis
Delivery of Health Care
Incidence

Keywords

  • ambulatory bloodstream infections
  • ambulatory healthcare associated infection
  • central venous catheter complications
  • healthcare associated infection
  • Home infusion therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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