Asian-White disparities in short sleep duration by industry of employment and occupation in the US: A cross-sectional study

Chandra L. Jackson, Ichiro Kawachi, Susan Redline, Hee Soon Juon, Frank B. Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Although short sleep is associated with an increased risk of morbidity as well as mortality and has been shown to vary by industry of employment and occupation, little is known about the relationship between work and sleep among Asian Americans. Methods. Using a nationally representative sample of US adults (n = 125,610) in the National Health Interview Survey from 2004-2011, we estimated prevalence ratios for self-reported short sleep duration (<7 hours) in Asians compared to Whites by industry of employment and occupation using adjusted Poisson regression models with robust variance. Results: Asians were more likely to report short sleep duration than Whites (33 vs. 28%, p < 0.001), and the Asian-White disparity was widest in finance/information and healthcare industries. Compared to Whites after adjustments, short sleep was also more prevalent among Asians employed in Public administration (PR = 1.35 [95% CI: 1.17,1.56]), Education (PR = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.08,1.53]), and Professional/Management (PR = 1.18 [95% CI: 1.03,1.36]). Short sleep, however, was lower among Asians in Accommodation/Food (PR = 0.81 [95% CI: 0.66, 0.99]) with no difference in Retail. In professional and support-service occupations, short sleep was higher among Asians, but was not different among laborers. Conclusions: U.S. Asian-White disparities in short sleep varied by industries, suggesting a need to consider both race and occupational characteristics to identify high-risk individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number552
JournalBMC public health
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2014

Keywords

  • Asian
  • Industry
  • Occupation
  • Race
  • Sleep
  • Work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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