Artificial antigen-presenting cells: Artificial solutions for real diseases

Mathias Oelke, Christine Krueger, Robert L. Giuntoli, Jonathan P Schneck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adoptive immunotherapy, which involves the transfer of autologous antigen-specific T cells generated ex vivo, is a promising strategy to treat a variety of life-threatening diseases. Unfortunately, current approaches for generating sufficient numbers of antigen-specific T cells lack the ability to serve as reproducible and economically viable methods. This has spurred the development of both cell- and non-cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells to alleviate problems associated with peptide-loaded dendritic cells in current approaches to adoptive immunotherapy. Here, we review new strategies for the ex vivo generation of antigen-specific T cells and their clinical application. These new approaches have the potential to spearhead a new era of successful adoptive immunotherapy for cancer and infectious diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-420
Number of pages9
JournalTrends in Molecular Medicine
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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Adoptive Immunotherapy
Antigen-Presenting Cells
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Autoantigens
Dendritic Cells
Communicable Diseases
Peptides
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Artificial antigen-presenting cells : Artificial solutions for real diseases. / Oelke, Mathias; Krueger, Christine; Giuntoli, Robert L.; Schneck, Jonathan P.

In: Trends in Molecular Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 412-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oelke, Mathias ; Krueger, Christine ; Giuntoli, Robert L. ; Schneck, Jonathan P. / Artificial antigen-presenting cells : Artificial solutions for real diseases. In: Trends in Molecular Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 11, No. 9. pp. 412-420.
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