Articulatory correlates of voice qualities of good guys and Bad Guys in Japanese Anime: An MRI study

Mihoko Teshigawara, Emi Zuiki Murano

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper examines the articulatory correlates of the Hero and Villain Voice Types, which were auditorily identified in a separate study on cartoon voices, using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. In general, the MRI images were in good agreement with the previous auditory analysis results; the major characteristic difference between voice quality settings of heroes and those of villains and between two villainous voice types was found in the supraglottal states and the pharyngeal cavity. Auditory analysis can be as valid as acoustic or any other analysis method depending on the level of training in a commonly accepted system such as Laver's framework for voice quality description. However, the MRI technique also allowed us to see what would not be observed otherwise, e.g., larynx height, pharyngeal cavity, vocal tract length, and the position of the hyoid bone. Auditory and physiological methods should be used in combination in order to further our understanding of the larynx and the pharynx.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1249-1252
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Event8th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, ICSLP 2004 - Jeju, Jeju Island, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Oct 4 2004Oct 8 2004

Other

Other8th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, ICSLP 2004
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityJeju, Jeju Island
Period10/4/0410/8/04

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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    Teshigawara, M., & Murano, E. Z. (2004). Articulatory correlates of voice qualities of good guys and Bad Guys in Japanese Anime: An MRI study. 1249-1252. Paper presented at 8th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, ICSLP 2004, Jeju, Jeju Island, Korea, Republic of.