Arsenic in groundwater in private wells in rural North Dakota and South Dakota: Water quality assessment for an intervention trial

Martha Powers, Joseph Yracheta, David Harvey, Marcia O'Leary, Lyle G. Best, Annabelle Black Bear, Luke MacDonald, Jolie Susan, Khaled Hasan, Elizabeth Thomas, Camille Morgan, Pablo Olmedo, Rui Chen, Ana M Rule, Kellogg Schwab, Ana Navas Acien, Christine Marie George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Elevated exposure to arsenic disproportionately affects populations relying on private well water in the United States (US). This includes many American Indian (AI) communities where naturally occurring arsenic is often above 10 µg/L, the current US Environmental Protection Agency safety standard. The Strong Heart Water Study is a randomized controlled trial aiming to reduce arsenic exposure to private well water users in AI communities in North Dakota and South Dakota. In preparation for this intervention, 371 households were included in a community water arsenic testing program to identify households with arsenic ≥10 µg/L by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Arsenic ≥10 µg/L was found in 97/371 (26.1%) households; median water arsenic concentration was 6.3 µg/L, ranging from <1–198 µg/L. Silica was identified as a water quality parameter that could impact the efficacy of arsenic removal devices to be installed. A low-range field rapid arsenic testing kit evaluated in a small number of households was found to have low accuracy; therefore, not an option for the screening of affected households in this setting. In a pilot study of the effectiveness of a point-of-use adsorptive media water filtration device for arsenic removal, all devices installed removed arsenic below 1 µg/L at both installation and 9 months post-installation. This study identified a relatively high burden of arsenic in AI study communities as well as an effective water filtration device to reduce arsenic in these communities. The long-term efficacy of a community based arsenic mitigation program in reducing arsenic exposure and preventing arsenic related disease is being tested as part of the Strong Heart Water Study.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages41-47
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental research
Volume168
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Water Quality
Groundwater
Arsenic
Water quality
arsenic
water quality
well
groundwater
Water
North American Indians
Water filtration
Device Removal
trial
well water
water
Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Equipment and Supplies
Environmental Protection Agency
Testing

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Arsenic
  • Drinking water
  • Field test kit
  • Intervention
  • Private well

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Arsenic in groundwater in private wells in rural North Dakota and South Dakota : Water quality assessment for an intervention trial. / Powers, Martha; Yracheta, Joseph; Harvey, David; O'Leary, Marcia; Best, Lyle G.; Black Bear, Annabelle; MacDonald, Luke; Susan, Jolie; Hasan, Khaled; Thomas, Elizabeth; Morgan, Camille; Olmedo, Pablo; Chen, Rui; Rule, Ana M; Schwab, Kellogg; Navas Acien, Ana; George, Christine Marie.

In: Environmental research, Vol. 168, 01.01.2019, p. 41-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Powers, M, Yracheta, J, Harvey, D, O'Leary, M, Best, LG, Black Bear, A, MacDonald, L, Susan, J, Hasan, K, Thomas, E, Morgan, C, Olmedo, P, Chen, R, Rule, AM, Schwab, K, Navas Acien, A & George, CM 2019, 'Arsenic in groundwater in private wells in rural North Dakota and South Dakota: Water quality assessment for an intervention trial' Environmental research, vol. 168, pp. 41-47. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.016
Powers, Martha ; Yracheta, Joseph ; Harvey, David ; O'Leary, Marcia ; Best, Lyle G. ; Black Bear, Annabelle ; MacDonald, Luke ; Susan, Jolie ; Hasan, Khaled ; Thomas, Elizabeth ; Morgan, Camille ; Olmedo, Pablo ; Chen, Rui ; Rule, Ana M ; Schwab, Kellogg ; Navas Acien, Ana ; George, Christine Marie. / Arsenic in groundwater in private wells in rural North Dakota and South Dakota : Water quality assessment for an intervention trial. In: Environmental research. 2019 ; Vol. 168. pp. 41-47.
@article{2c58f74ec1484e5aa2c2d4ee51544794,
title = "Arsenic in groundwater in private wells in rural North Dakota and South Dakota: Water quality assessment for an intervention trial",
abstract = "Elevated exposure to arsenic disproportionately affects populations relying on private well water in the United States (US). This includes many American Indian (AI) communities where naturally occurring arsenic is often above 10 µg/L, the current US Environmental Protection Agency safety standard. The Strong Heart Water Study is a randomized controlled trial aiming to reduce arsenic exposure to private well water users in AI communities in North Dakota and South Dakota. In preparation for this intervention, 371 households were included in a community water arsenic testing program to identify households with arsenic ≥10 µg/L by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Arsenic ≥10 µg/L was found in 97/371 (26.1{\%}) households; median water arsenic concentration was 6.3 µg/L, ranging from <1–198 µg/L. Silica was identified as a water quality parameter that could impact the efficacy of arsenic removal devices to be installed. A low-range field rapid arsenic testing kit evaluated in a small number of households was found to have low accuracy; therefore, not an option for the screening of affected households in this setting. In a pilot study of the effectiveness of a point-of-use adsorptive media water filtration device for arsenic removal, all devices installed removed arsenic below 1 µg/L at both installation and 9 months post-installation. This study identified a relatively high burden of arsenic in AI study communities as well as an effective water filtration device to reduce arsenic in these communities. The long-term efficacy of a community based arsenic mitigation program in reducing arsenic exposure and preventing arsenic related disease is being tested as part of the Strong Heart Water Study.",
keywords = "American Indian, Arsenic, Drinking water, Field test kit, Intervention, Private well",
author = "Martha Powers and Joseph Yracheta and David Harvey and Marcia O'Leary and Best, {Lyle G.} and {Black Bear}, Annabelle and Luke MacDonald and Jolie Susan and Khaled Hasan and Elizabeth Thomas and Camille Morgan and Pablo Olmedo and Rui Chen and Rule, {Ana M} and Kellogg Schwab and {Navas Acien}, Ana and George, {Christine Marie}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "168",
pages = "41--47",
journal = "Environmental Research",
issn = "0013-9351",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arsenic in groundwater in private wells in rural North Dakota and South Dakota

T2 - Environmental Research

AU - Powers, Martha

AU - Yracheta, Joseph

AU - Harvey, David

AU - O'Leary, Marcia

AU - Best, Lyle G.

AU - Black Bear, Annabelle

AU - MacDonald, Luke

AU - Susan, Jolie

AU - Hasan, Khaled

AU - Thomas, Elizabeth

AU - Morgan, Camille

AU - Olmedo, Pablo

AU - Chen, Rui

AU - Rule, Ana M

AU - Schwab, Kellogg

AU - Navas Acien, Ana

AU - George, Christine Marie

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Elevated exposure to arsenic disproportionately affects populations relying on private well water in the United States (US). This includes many American Indian (AI) communities where naturally occurring arsenic is often above 10 µg/L, the current US Environmental Protection Agency safety standard. The Strong Heart Water Study is a randomized controlled trial aiming to reduce arsenic exposure to private well water users in AI communities in North Dakota and South Dakota. In preparation for this intervention, 371 households were included in a community water arsenic testing program to identify households with arsenic ≥10 µg/L by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Arsenic ≥10 µg/L was found in 97/371 (26.1%) households; median water arsenic concentration was 6.3 µg/L, ranging from <1–198 µg/L. Silica was identified as a water quality parameter that could impact the efficacy of arsenic removal devices to be installed. A low-range field rapid arsenic testing kit evaluated in a small number of households was found to have low accuracy; therefore, not an option for the screening of affected households in this setting. In a pilot study of the effectiveness of a point-of-use adsorptive media water filtration device for arsenic removal, all devices installed removed arsenic below 1 µg/L at both installation and 9 months post-installation. This study identified a relatively high burden of arsenic in AI study communities as well as an effective water filtration device to reduce arsenic in these communities. The long-term efficacy of a community based arsenic mitigation program in reducing arsenic exposure and preventing arsenic related disease is being tested as part of the Strong Heart Water Study.

AB - Elevated exposure to arsenic disproportionately affects populations relying on private well water in the United States (US). This includes many American Indian (AI) communities where naturally occurring arsenic is often above 10 µg/L, the current US Environmental Protection Agency safety standard. The Strong Heart Water Study is a randomized controlled trial aiming to reduce arsenic exposure to private well water users in AI communities in North Dakota and South Dakota. In preparation for this intervention, 371 households were included in a community water arsenic testing program to identify households with arsenic ≥10 µg/L by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Arsenic ≥10 µg/L was found in 97/371 (26.1%) households; median water arsenic concentration was 6.3 µg/L, ranging from <1–198 µg/L. Silica was identified as a water quality parameter that could impact the efficacy of arsenic removal devices to be installed. A low-range field rapid arsenic testing kit evaluated in a small number of households was found to have low accuracy; therefore, not an option for the screening of affected households in this setting. In a pilot study of the effectiveness of a point-of-use adsorptive media water filtration device for arsenic removal, all devices installed removed arsenic below 1 µg/L at both installation and 9 months post-installation. This study identified a relatively high burden of arsenic in AI study communities as well as an effective water filtration device to reduce arsenic in these communities. The long-term efficacy of a community based arsenic mitigation program in reducing arsenic exposure and preventing arsenic related disease is being tested as part of the Strong Heart Water Study.

KW - American Indian

KW - Arsenic

KW - Drinking water

KW - Field test kit

KW - Intervention

KW - Private well

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053785600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053785600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.016

DO - 10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.016

M3 - Article

VL - 168

SP - 41

EP - 47

JO - Environmental Research

JF - Environmental Research

SN - 0013-9351

ER -