Arm paralysis after routine childhood vaccinations: Application of advanced molecular methods to the causality assessment of an adverse event after immunization

Jana Shaw, Neal A. Halsey, Adriana Weinberg, D. Scott Schmid, Kirsten St George, William C. Weldon, Michael Jordan, Patrick W. Bryant, Philip S. LaRussa, Deborah Y. Bradshaw, Theresa Harrington, Anne Gershon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Post-licensure surveillance for adverse events following immunizations (AEFI) can identify rare complications of vaccinations and rigorous vaccine adverse event causality assessments can help to identify possible causal relationships. We report the development of arm paralysis after varicella vaccination in a 1-year-old child. Paralysis was initially presumed to be due to vOka because of the temporal relationship between vaccination and onset of arm weakness; however, molecular studies identified wild-type varicella zoster virus VZV (WT-VZV) in the CSF, leading the authors to conclude that WT-VZV was the probable cause. This case illustrates the complexity of assessing AEFI causality, and the importance of careful and complete evaluations when determining the most likely cause of an AEFI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e161-e164
JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Keywords

  • Adverse event after vaccination
  • Child
  • Paralysis
  • Vaccine
  • Varicella-zoster virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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