Area and volume measurement of posterior fossa structures in MRI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine the extent to which area measures of posterior fossa structures can be used confidently to represent structure volumes. MRI scans were obtained from three groups: fragile X males, males with other developmental disabilities, and males with normal IQ. The areas of the midbrain, pons, medulla, cerebellar vermis, and fourth ventricle were measured in midsagittal sections. Volumes of midbrain, pons, medulla, cerebellum, fourth ventricle, and third ventricle were obtained by measuring these structures in contiguous axial slices. In addition, the largest axial area for each structure was identified. Analysis revealed that midsagittal area measures for pons, medulla, and fourth ventricle were significantly correlated with structure volumes, and that all of the largest axial area measures were significantly correlated with structure volumes. However, only the midsagittal area measure of fourth ventricle and the largest axial area measures of fourth ventricle and cerebellum were correlated with volume measures with an r of .80 of greater. Results of this study suggest that area measures may not accurately represent three-dimensional structure size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-168
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Fourth Ventricle
Pons
Mesencephalon
Cerebellum
Developmental Disabilities
Third Ventricle
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Area and volume measurement of posterior fossa structures in MRI. / Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Reiss, Allan.

In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, Vol. 25, No. 4, 1991, p. 159-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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