Are two doctors better than one? Women's physician use and appropriate care

Jillian T. Henderson, Carol S. Weisman, Holly Grason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines nonelderly women's concurrent use of two types of physicians (generalists and obstetrician-gynecologists) for regular health care and associations with receipt of preventive care, including a range of recommended screening, counseling, and heart disease prevention services. Data are from the 1999 Women's Health Care Experiences Survey conducted in Baltimore, Maryland, using random digit dialing (N = 509 women ages 18 to 64). Key findings are: 58% of women report using two physicians (a generalist and an ob/gyn) for regular care; seeing both a generalist and an ob/gyn, compared with seeing a generalist alone, is consistently associated with receiving more clinical preventive services, including screening, counseling, and preventive services related to heart disease. Because seeing an ob/gyn in addition to a generalist physician is associated with receiving recommended preventive services (even for heart disease), the findings suggest that non-elderly women who rely on a generalist alone may receive substandard preventive care. The implications for women's access to ob/gyns and for appropriate design of women's primary care are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-149
Number of pages12
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Women Physicians
physician
heart disease
Heart Diseases
Preventive Medicine
Physicians
Counseling
counseling
Health Care Surveys
Baltimore
health care
Women's Health
Primary Health Care
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Are two doctors better than one? Women's physician use and appropriate care. / Henderson, Jillian T.; Weisman, Carol S.; Grason, Holly.

In: Women's Health Issues, Vol. 12, No. 3, 2002, p. 138-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henderson, Jillian T. ; Weisman, Carol S. ; Grason, Holly. / Are two doctors better than one? Women's physician use and appropriate care. In: Women's Health Issues. 2002 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 138-149.
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