Are There Racial Disparities in Psychotropic Drug Use and Expenditures in a Nationally Representative Sample of Men in the United States? Evidence From the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

Geraldine Pierre, Roland J. Thorpe, Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie, Darrell J. Gaskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article sought to determine whether racial disparities exist in psychotropic drug use and expenditures in a nationally representative sample of men in the United States. Data were extracted from the 2000-2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a longitudinal survey that covers the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population. Full-Year Consolidated, Medical Conditions, and Prescribed Medicines data files were merged across 10 years of data. The sample of interest was limited to adult males aged 18 to 64 years, who reported their race as White, Black, Hispanic, or Asian. This study employed a pooled cross-sectional design and a two-part probit generalized linear model for analyses. Minority men reported a lower probability of psychotropic drug use (Black = -4.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [-5.5, -3.0]; Hispanic = -3.8%, 95% CI = [-5.1, -2.6]; Asian = -4.5%, 95% CI = [-6.2, -2.7]) compared with White men. After controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, and health status variables, there were no statistically significant race differences in drug expenditures. Consistent with previous literature, racial and ethnic disparities in the use of psychotropic drugs present problems of access to mental health care and services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-90
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of men's health
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • access to care
  • health inequality/disparity
  • health policy issues
  • mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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