Are sequential compression devices commonly associated with in-hospital falls? A myth-busters review using the patient safety net database

Matthew M. Boelig, Michael B Streiff, Deborah B. Hobson, Peggy S. Kraus, Peter J. Pronovost, Elliott Haut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Sequential compression devices (SCDs) help prevent deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in hospitalized patients; however, clinicians often decline to use this therapy because of a perceived increased risk for patient falls. There is limited information regarding the association between the use of SCDs and patient falls. In this study, we analyze if SCD use is a common risk factor for in-hospital falls. Methods: We used the Patient Safety Net event reporting system at our university-affiliated hospital to retrospectively quantify reports of SCD-related falls over a nearly 5-year period (July 1, 2004, through May 25, 2009). The primary outcome was to determine how often SCD-related falls occurred in relation to SCD patient days. Secondary aims of this study included an assessment of the severity of SCD-related falls, as well as potential risk factors for such falls. Results: Three thousand five hundred sixty-two total falls were reported during our study period, 16 of which (0.45%) were SCD-related falls. There were 0.063 SCD-related falls per 1000 SCD patient days or 1 fall for every 15,774 SCD patient days. The mean age of patients was 57.8 ± 14.4 years, 69% were male subjects, 81% were on a surgical ward, and 69% occurred while attempting to toilet. Only 2 of the SCD-related falls caused temporary harm that required intervention. Conclusions: Sequential compression device use is rarely associated with in-hospital patient falls, and SCD-related falls are not more harmful than other types of falls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-79
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Patient Safety
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

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Patient Safety
Databases
Equipment and Supplies
Pulmonary Embolism
Venous Thrombosis

Keywords

  • deep venous thrombosis
  • falls
  • pulmonary embolism
  • sequential compression devices
  • venous thromboembolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Are sequential compression devices commonly associated with in-hospital falls? A myth-busters review using the patient safety net database. / Boelig, Matthew M.; Streiff, Michael B; Hobson, Deborah B.; Kraus, Peggy S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Haut, Elliott.

In: Journal of Patient Safety, Vol. 7, No. 2, 06.2011, p. 77-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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