Are preterm black infants larger than preterm white infants, or are they more misclassified?

S. Suthutvoravut, C. J R Hogue, Bernard Guyer, M. Anderka, M. W. Oberle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In birth certificate data for Massachusetts resident births from 1978 to 1982, 12-27% of births purportedly under 31 weeks of gestation were probably misclassified, i.e. had birthweight ≥ 2500 g. Correcting for maldistribution of births removed 34% and 23%, respectively, of black and white births with reported gestational ages <36 weeks but with implausible weights. Percentages of unknown and incomplement reports of last menstrual period were also significantly higher for blacks. After adjustment, preterm black infants weighed less than whites at each gestational age. The proportion of infants <2500 g born at term (≥ 37 weeks gestation) was higher (although not significantly) among blacks. These findings are consistent with hypotheses that low socioeconomic status negatively affects the rate of intrauterine growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)443-451
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biosocial Science
Volume21
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Premature Infants
infant
Parturition
Gestational Age
Birth Certificates
Pregnancy
Social Class
certification
social status
Weights and Measures
resident
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Demography

Cite this

Suthutvoravut, S., Hogue, C. J. R., Guyer, B., Anderka, M., & Oberle, M. W. (1989). Are preterm black infants larger than preterm white infants, or are they more misclassified? Journal of Biosocial Science, 21(4), 443-451.

Are preterm black infants larger than preterm white infants, or are they more misclassified? / Suthutvoravut, S.; Hogue, C. J R; Guyer, Bernard; Anderka, M.; Oberle, M. W.

In: Journal of Biosocial Science, Vol. 21, No. 4, 1989, p. 443-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suthutvoravut, S, Hogue, CJR, Guyer, B, Anderka, M & Oberle, MW 1989, 'Are preterm black infants larger than preterm white infants, or are they more misclassified?', Journal of Biosocial Science, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 443-451.
Suthutvoravut, S. ; Hogue, C. J R ; Guyer, Bernard ; Anderka, M. ; Oberle, M. W. / Are preterm black infants larger than preterm white infants, or are they more misclassified?. In: Journal of Biosocial Science. 1989 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 443-451.
@article{ee60b41d03ea4bdcb549a3ef30a76945,
title = "Are preterm black infants larger than preterm white infants, or are they more misclassified?",
abstract = "In birth certificate data for Massachusetts resident births from 1978 to 1982, 12-27{\%} of births purportedly under 31 weeks of gestation were probably misclassified, i.e. had birthweight ≥ 2500 g. Correcting for maldistribution of births removed 34{\%} and 23{\%}, respectively, of black and white births with reported gestational ages <36 weeks but with implausible weights. Percentages of unknown and incomplement reports of last menstrual period were also significantly higher for blacks. After adjustment, preterm black infants weighed less than whites at each gestational age. The proportion of infants <2500 g born at term (≥ 37 weeks gestation) was higher (although not significantly) among blacks. These findings are consistent with hypotheses that low socioeconomic status negatively affects the rate of intrauterine growth.",
author = "S. Suthutvoravut and Hogue, {C. J R} and Bernard Guyer and M. Anderka and Oberle, {M. W.}",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "443--451",
journal = "Journal of Biosocial Science",
issn = "0021-9320",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are preterm black infants larger than preterm white infants, or are they more misclassified?

AU - Suthutvoravut, S.

AU - Hogue, C. J R

AU - Guyer, Bernard

AU - Anderka, M.

AU - Oberle, M. W.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - In birth certificate data for Massachusetts resident births from 1978 to 1982, 12-27% of births purportedly under 31 weeks of gestation were probably misclassified, i.e. had birthweight ≥ 2500 g. Correcting for maldistribution of births removed 34% and 23%, respectively, of black and white births with reported gestational ages <36 weeks but with implausible weights. Percentages of unknown and incomplement reports of last menstrual period were also significantly higher for blacks. After adjustment, preterm black infants weighed less than whites at each gestational age. The proportion of infants <2500 g born at term (≥ 37 weeks gestation) was higher (although not significantly) among blacks. These findings are consistent with hypotheses that low socioeconomic status negatively affects the rate of intrauterine growth.

AB - In birth certificate data for Massachusetts resident births from 1978 to 1982, 12-27% of births purportedly under 31 weeks of gestation were probably misclassified, i.e. had birthweight ≥ 2500 g. Correcting for maldistribution of births removed 34% and 23%, respectively, of black and white births with reported gestational ages <36 weeks but with implausible weights. Percentages of unknown and incomplement reports of last menstrual period were also significantly higher for blacks. After adjustment, preterm black infants weighed less than whites at each gestational age. The proportion of infants <2500 g born at term (≥ 37 weeks gestation) was higher (although not significantly) among blacks. These findings are consistent with hypotheses that low socioeconomic status negatively affects the rate of intrauterine growth.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024441072&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024441072&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2808471

AN - SCOPUS:0024441072

VL - 21

SP - 443

EP - 451

JO - Journal of Biosocial Science

JF - Journal of Biosocial Science

SN - 0021-9320

IS - 4

ER -