Are metabolites of l-deprenyl (selegiline) useful or harmful? Indications from preclinical research

Sevil Yasar, J. P. Goldberg, S. R. Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A frequent topic of controversy has been whether metabolism of l-deprenyl (selegiline) to active metabolites is a detriment to clinical use. This paper reviews possible roles of the metabolites of l-deprenyl in producing unwanted adverse side effects or in augmenting or mediating its clinically useful actions. Levels of l-amphetamine and l-methamphetamine likely to be reached, even with excessive intake of l-deprenyl, would be unlikely to produce neurotoxicity and there is no preclinical or clinical evidence of abuse liability of l-deprenyl. In contrast, there is evidence that l-amphetamine and l-methamphetamine have some qualitatively different actions than their disomer counterparts on EEG and cognitive functioning which might result in beneficial clinical effects and complement beneficial clinical actions of l-deprenyl itself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-73
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission, Supplement
Issue number48
StatePublished - 1996

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Selegiline
Research
Methamphetamine
Amphetamine
Electroencephalography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Are metabolites of l-deprenyl (selegiline) useful or harmful? Indications from preclinical research. / Yasar, Sevil; Goldberg, J. P.; Goldberg, S. R.

In: Journal of Neural Transmission, Supplement, No. 48, 1996, p. 61-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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