Are Haemophilus influenzae infections a significant problem in India? A prospective study and review

Invasive Bacterial Infections Surveillance (IBIS) Group of the International Clinical Epidemiology Network

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

It has been suggested Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) disease is uncommon in Asia. During 1993-1997, we conducted prospective surveillance of acute infections caused by H. influenzae in 6 academic referral Indian hospitals. The study included 5798 patients aged 1 month to 50 years who had diseases likely to be caused by H. influenzae; 75% of the patients were aged <5 years. A total of 125 H. influenzae infections were detected, 97% of which were caused by Hib. Of 125 isolates, 108 (86%) were from children aged <5 years, and 11 (9%) were from adults aged >18 years. Sixty-two percent of the patients had meningitis. The case-fatality rate was 11% overall and 20% in infants with Hib meningitis. Up to 60% of all isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, or erythromycin; 32% were resistant to 3 antimicrobial drugs, but none were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. These data suggest that available Hib vaccines will benefit Indian children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-957
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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