Are Children Born Small for Gestational Age at Increased Risk of Short Stature?

Ido Paz, Daniel S. Seidman, Yehuda L. Danon, Arie Laor, David K. Stevenson, Rena Gale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. —To assess the height outcome of newborns born small for gestational age. Design. —A historical prospective study. Setting. —A cohort of 1758 newborns born at a single university hospital maternity ward and subsequently examined at the military draft medical board at age 17 years. Participants. —Newborns whose weight at birth was below the third percentile were defined as small for gestational age. Their body measurements at age 17 years were compared with those of their peers who were appropriate for gestational age. Measurements/Main Results. —The adjusted mean ± SEM height for boys born small for gestational age vs peers born appropriate for gestational age was 169.9±1.5 vs 175.4±0.8 cm (P<.0001); and for girls, 159.4±1.3 vs 163.1 ±0.8 cm (P<.0005). In addition, the risk for height attainment below the 10th percentile was significantly increased for newborns born small for gestational age. The adjusted odds ratio was 4.13 for boys (95% confidence interval, 1.66 to 10.25; P<.0006) and 3.32 for girls (95% confidence interval, 1.38 to 8.05; P<.0005). Conclusion. —Infants born small for gestational age may be at increased risk for short stature in late adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-339
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume147
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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