Appraisal, coping, and social support as mediators of well-being in black and white family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease

William E. Haley, David L. Roth, Marci I. Coleton, Greg R. Ford, Constance A.C. West, Robert P. Collins, Teresa L. Isobe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) commonly have high levels of psychological distress. Black caregivers often report less depression than White caregivers, but the process underlying this difference is poorly understood. With the use of a stress process model, 123 White and 74 Black family caregivers of patients with AD and other progressive dementias were studied. Black caregivers appraised patient problems as less stressful and reported higher self-efficacy in managing caregiving problems and less depression than did White caregivers. White and Black caregivers also differed significantly in coping responses but not in social supports. Structural equation analyses indicated that the correlational structure of the stress process was similar in White and Black caregivers. Caregiving stressors and race did not affect well-being through direct paths, but they were mediated by effects for appraisal, social support and activity, and coping. Possible cultural mechanisms explaining the better adjustment among Black caregivers are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-129
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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