Applying choice architecture principles to understand HIV testing

Findings from malawi and zimbabwe

Adrienne H. Chung, Rajiv N. Rimal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Improvements spearheaded by the World Health Organization in antenatal HIV counseling in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2011 have seen a parallel increase in HIV testing. We sought to determine the extent to which the use of choice architecture principles (one that introduces an optout option as the default) affect uptake of HIV testing, above and beyond individual-level attitudes and cognitions. Demographic and Health Survey data collected between 2004 and 2011 from Zimbabwe (N = 1,330) and Malawi (N = 4,043)—countries where over 10% of adults have HIV—were analyzed. We explored the influence of demographic variables, modes of knowledge about HIV, stigma against people living with HIV, attitudes about spousal abuse, and whether or not HIV testing had been offered during antenatal visits. Results demonstrated that, taking into account secular trends in higher testing rates, structural-level support was the strongest predictor of HIV testing above and beyond individual-level attitudes and cognitions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-372
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume27
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Malawi
Zimbabwe
HIV
cognition
WHO
counseling
Cognition
abuse
Demography
Spouse Abuse
trend
health
Africa South of the Sahara
Counseling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Applying choice architecture principles to understand HIV testing : Findings from malawi and zimbabwe. / Chung, Adrienne H.; Rimal, Rajiv N.

In: AIDS Education and Prevention, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.08.2015, p. 362-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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