Application of dna hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugees in thailand

David N. Taylor, Peter Echeverria, Chittima Pitarangsi, Jitvimol Seriwatana, Orntipa Sethabutr, Ladaporn Bodhidatta, Carlton Brown, John E. Herrmann, Neil R. Blacklow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The epidemiology and etiology of acute diarrheal disease were determined in a Hmong refugee camp on the Thai-Laotian border from April 11 to May 14, 1985. DNA hybridization techniques were used to detect Shigella species, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli. A monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect rotavirus, and standard microbiology was used to detect other enteropathogens. The age-specific diarrheal disease rates were 47 episodes per month per 1,000 children less than five years old and 113 episodes per month per 1,000 children less than one year old. Rotavirus, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Campylobacter, and Cryptosporidium were the predominant pathogens in children less than two years old. The DNA probe hybridized with 94% of 31 specimens identified as enterotoxigenic E. coli by the standard assays and with none of the specimens in which the standard assays were negative. The probe for Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli hybridized in eight of 10 stools that contained Shigella and four of 314 stools from which Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli were not isolated. The use of DNA probes allows specimens to be collected in remote areas with a minimum amount of equipment and technical expertise so that they can be easily transported to a central laboratory for further processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-187
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume127
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Refugees
Shigella
Thailand
Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli
Rotavirus
DNA Probes
Escherichia coli
Professional Competence
Cryptosporidium
Campylobacter
Acute Disease
Microbiology
Epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Equipment and Supplies
DNA

Keywords

  • Campylobacter
  • Coccidia
  • Diarrhea
  • Escherichia coli
  • Refugees
  • Rotaviruses
  • Shigella

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Taylor, D. N., Echeverria, P., Pitarangsi, C., Seriwatana, J., Sethabutr, O., Bodhidatta, L., ... Blacklow, N. R. (1988). Application of dna hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugees in thailand. American Journal of Epidemiology, 127(1), 179-187.

Application of dna hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugees in thailand. / Taylor, David N.; Echeverria, Peter; Pitarangsi, Chittima; Seriwatana, Jitvimol; Sethabutr, Orntipa; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Brown, Carlton; Herrmann, John E.; Blacklow, Neil R.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 127, No. 1, 01.1988, p. 179-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, DN, Echeverria, P, Pitarangsi, C, Seriwatana, J, Sethabutr, O, Bodhidatta, L, Brown, C, Herrmann, JE & Blacklow, NR 1988, 'Application of dna hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugees in thailand', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 127, no. 1, pp. 179-187.
Taylor DN, Echeverria P, Pitarangsi C, Seriwatana J, Sethabutr O, Bodhidatta L et al. Application of dna hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugees in thailand. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1988 Jan;127(1):179-187.
Taylor, David N. ; Echeverria, Peter ; Pitarangsi, Chittima ; Seriwatana, Jitvimol ; Sethabutr, Orntipa ; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn ; Brown, Carlton ; Herrmann, John E. ; Blacklow, Neil R. / Application of dna hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugees in thailand. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1988 ; Vol. 127, No. 1. pp. 179-187.
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