Apolipoprotein E polymorphism influences postprandial retinyl palmitate but not triglyceride concentrations

Eric Boerwinkle, Spencer Brown, A. Richey Sharrett, Gerardo Heiss, Wolfgang Patsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To quantify the effect of the apolipoprotein (apo) E polymorphism on the magnitude of postprandial lipemia, we have defined its role in determining the response to a single high-fat meal in a large sample of (N = 474) individuals taking part in the biethnic Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. The profile of postprandial response in plasma was monitored over 8 h by triglyceride, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TGRL)-triglyceride, apo B- 48/apo B-100 ratio, and retinyl palmitate concentrations, and the apo E polymorphism was determined by DNA amplification and digestion. The frequency of the apo E alleles and their effects on fasting lipid levels in this sample were similar to those reported elsewhere. Postprandial plasma retinyl palmitate response to a high-fat meal with vitamin A was significantly different among apo E genotypes, with delayed clearance in individuals with an ε2 allele, compared with ε3/3 and ε3/4 individuals. In the sample of 397 Caucasians, average retinyl palmitate response was 1,489 μg/dl in ε2/3 individuals, compared with 1,037 μg/dl in ε3/3 individuals and 1,108 μg/dl in ε3/4 individuals. The apo E polymorphism accounted for 7.1% of the interindividual variation in postprandial retinyl palmitate response, a contribution proportionally greater than its well-known effect on fasting LDL-cholesterol. However, despite this effect on postprandial retinyl palmitate, the profile of postprandial triglyceride response was not significantly different among apo E genotypes. The profile of postprandial response was consistent between the sample of Caucasians and a smaller sample of black subjects. While these data indicate that the removal of remnant particles from circulation is delayed in subjects with the ε2/3 genotype, there is no reported evidence that the ε2 allele predisposes to coronary artery disease (CAD). The results of this study provide not only a reliable estimate of the magnitude of the effect of the apo E polymorphism on various measurements commonly used to characterize postprandial lipemia, but also provide mechanistic insight into the effects of the apo E gene polymorphism on postprandial lipemia and CAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-360
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Genetics
Volume54
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Apolipoproteins E
Triglycerides
Hyperlipidemias
Alleles
Genotype
Meals
Coronary Artery Disease
Fasting
Fats
Apolipoprotein B-48
Apolipoprotein B-100
retinol palmitate
Vitamin A
LDL Cholesterol
Digestion
Atherosclerosis
Lipids
DNA
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Boerwinkle, E., Brown, S., Sharrett, A. R., Heiss, G., & Patsch, W. (1994). Apolipoprotein E polymorphism influences postprandial retinyl palmitate but not triglyceride concentrations. American Journal of Human Genetics, 54(2), 341-360.

Apolipoprotein E polymorphism influences postprandial retinyl palmitate but not triglyceride concentrations. / Boerwinkle, Eric; Brown, Spencer; Sharrett, A. Richey; Heiss, Gerardo; Patsch, Wolfgang.

In: American Journal of Human Genetics, Vol. 54, No. 2, 02.1994, p. 341-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boerwinkle, E, Brown, S, Sharrett, AR, Heiss, G & Patsch, W 1994, 'Apolipoprotein E polymorphism influences postprandial retinyl palmitate but not triglyceride concentrations', American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 341-360.
Boerwinkle, Eric ; Brown, Spencer ; Sharrett, A. Richey ; Heiss, Gerardo ; Patsch, Wolfgang. / Apolipoprotein E polymorphism influences postprandial retinyl palmitate but not triglyceride concentrations. In: American Journal of Human Genetics. 1994 ; Vol. 54, No. 2. pp. 341-360.
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