Aortic valve replacement in neonates and infants: an analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

Ronald K. Woods, Sara K. Pasquali, Marshall L Jacobs, Erle H. Austin, Jeffrey P. Jacobs, Mary Krolikowski, Michael E. Mitchell, Christian Pizarro, James S. Tweddell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We sought to describe early outcomes of aortic valve replacement in neonates and infants across a large multicenter cohort. Neonates and infants in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database undergoing nontruncal aortic valve replacement with the Ross-Konno procedure, Ross procedure, or homograft replacement from 2000 to 2009 were included. Preoperative characteristics, operative data, and early outcomes are described. A total of 160 patients (43 neonates, 117 infants) from 47 centers were included. Society of Thoracic Surgeons-defined preoperative risk factors were present in 76 patients (48%) and were most prevalent in neonates (67%) and patients undergoing homograft aortic valve replacement (93%). Concomitant arch repair or mitral valve surgery was performed in 30 patients (19%) and 19 patients (12%), respectively. Postoperative mechanical circulatory support was used in 17 patients (11%). Overall in-hospital mortality was 18% and was highest for neonates (28%) and patients undergoing homograft aortic valve replacement (40%). Concomitant arch repair was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (33% vs 15%, P = .02), whereas concurrent mitral valve surgery was not (21% vs 18%, P = .73). Postoperative mechanical circulatory support was also associated with increased in-hospital mortality (65% vs 13%, P 

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1084-1089
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume144
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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