Anxiety disorders and risk for suicide attempts: Findings from the Baltimore epidemiologic catchment area follow-up study

James M. Bolton, Brian J. Cox, Tracie O. Afifi, Murray W. Enns, O. Joseph Bienvenu, Jitender Sareen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our objective was to determine whether the presence of an anxiety disorder was a risk factor for future suicide attempts. Data were drawn from the 13-year follow-up Baltimore Epidemiological Catchment Area survey (n = 1,920). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline anxiety disorders (social phobia, simple phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic attacks, or agoraphobia) and subsequent onset suicide attempts. The presence of one or more anxiety disorders at baseline was significantly associated with subsequent onset suicide attempts (adjusted odds ratio 2.20, 95% confidence interval 1.04-4.64) after controlling for sociodemographic variables and all baseline mental disorders assessed in the survey. These findings suggest that anxiety disorders are independent risk factors for suicide attempts, and underscore the importance of anxiety disorders as a serious public health problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-481
Number of pages5
JournalDepression and anxiety
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2008

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Comorbidity
  • Epidemiology
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Anxiety disorders and risk for suicide attempts: Findings from the Baltimore epidemiologic catchment area follow-up study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this