Antrectomy for multicentric, argyrophil gastric carcinoids: A preliminary report

Frederic Eckhauser, R. V. Lloyd, N. W. Thompson, S. E. Raper, A. I. Vinik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Multicentric gastric carcinoids develop infrequently in association with atrophic gastritis, achlorhydria, and hypergastrinemia. These unusual tumors, thought to arise from proliferation of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells, have not been shown to secrete any measurable biogenic amines and usually grow slowly. Hypergastrinemia, which results from antral G cell stimulation secondary to atrophic gastritis, is believed to be the trophic stimulus, but alternative explanations include production of gastrin-releasing factor (GRF) or gastrin per se by the tumor. We recently encountered two patients with pentagastrin-resistant achlorhydria and multiple gastric carcinoids. Neither had symptoms of carcinoid syndrome. Urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and serum human pancreatic polypeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and motilin values were normal. Fasting gastrin values were nearly 1800 pg/ml. Antrectomy and regional lymphadenectomy was performed in each patient. The tumors were locally invasive with penetration through the submucosa. One patient had regional lymph node involvement, and one had an isolated hepatic metastasis. Immunohistochemical stain tests were positive in both patients for neuron-specific enolase and chromogranin, with focal positive staining for gastrin and serotonin. Serum gastrin levels decreased to less than 25 pg/ml after antrectomy. Evaluation with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy examination 4 to 6 months after antrectomy showed complete regression of disease in one patient and residual neoplasm in one patient, despite normal serum gastrin levels. Additional studies with careful long-term follow-up will be needed to determine whether antrectomy eliminates the hypergastrinemia associated with enterochromaffin-like hyperplasia and leads to regression of disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1046-1053
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery
Volume104
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastrins
Carcinoid Tumor
Stomach
Achlorhydria
Atrophic Gastritis
Serum
Enterochromaffin-like Cells
Motilin
Chromogranins
Pentagastrin
Neoplasms
Gastrin-Secreting Cells
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
Biogenic Amines
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide
Residual Neoplasm
Lymph Node Excision
Hyperplasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Eckhauser, F., Lloyd, R. V., Thompson, N. W., Raper, S. E., & Vinik, A. I. (1988). Antrectomy for multicentric, argyrophil gastric carcinoids: A preliminary report. Surgery, 104(6), 1046-1053.

Antrectomy for multicentric, argyrophil gastric carcinoids : A preliminary report. / Eckhauser, Frederic; Lloyd, R. V.; Thompson, N. W.; Raper, S. E.; Vinik, A. I.

In: Surgery, Vol. 104, No. 6, 1988, p. 1046-1053.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eckhauser, F, Lloyd, RV, Thompson, NW, Raper, SE & Vinik, AI 1988, 'Antrectomy for multicentric, argyrophil gastric carcinoids: A preliminary report', Surgery, vol. 104, no. 6, pp. 1046-1053.
Eckhauser F, Lloyd RV, Thompson NW, Raper SE, Vinik AI. Antrectomy for multicentric, argyrophil gastric carcinoids: A preliminary report. Surgery. 1988;104(6):1046-1053.
Eckhauser, Frederic ; Lloyd, R. V. ; Thompson, N. W. ; Raper, S. E. ; Vinik, A. I. / Antrectomy for multicentric, argyrophil gastric carcinoids : A preliminary report. In: Surgery. 1988 ; Vol. 104, No. 6. pp. 1046-1053.
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