Antiviral treatment normalizes neurophysiological but not movement abnormalities in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys

Howard S. Fox, Michael R. Weed, Salvador Huitron-Resendiz, Jamal Baig, Thomas F W Horn, Peter J. Dailey, Norbert Bischofberger, Steven J. Henriksen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus monkeys provides an excellent model of the central nervous system (CNS) consequences of HIV infection. To discern the relationship between vital load and abnormalities induced in the CNS by the virus, we infected animals with SIV and later instituted antiviral treatment to lower peripheral vital load. Measurement of sensory-evoked potentials, assessing CNS neuronal circuitry, revealed delayed latencies after infection that could be reversed by lowering vital load. Cessation of treatment led to the reappearance of these abnormalities. In contrast, the decline in general motor activity induced by SIV infection was unaffected by antiviral treatment. An acute increase in the level of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) was found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) relative to plasma in the infected animals at the peak of acute viremia, likely contributing to an early influx of immune cells into the CNS. Examination of the brains of the infected animals after return of the electrophysiological abnormalities revealed diverse vital and inflammatory findings. Although some of the physiological abnormalities resulting from SIV infection can be at least temporarily reversed by lowering viral load, the viral-host interactions initiated by infection may result in long-lasting changes in CNS-mediated functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-45
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume106
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
Haplorhini
Antiviral Agents
Central Nervous System
Virus Diseases
Therapeutics
Withholding Treatment
Chemokine CCL2
Viremia
Infection
Macaca mulatta
Viral Load
Chemokines
Evoked Potentials
HIV Infections
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Motor Activity
Viruses
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fox, H. S., Weed, M. R., Huitron-Resendiz, S., Baig, J., Horn, T. F. W., Dailey, P. J., ... Henriksen, S. J. (2000). Antiviral treatment normalizes neurophysiological but not movement abnormalities in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 106(1), 37-45.

Antiviral treatment normalizes neurophysiological but not movement abnormalities in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. / Fox, Howard S.; Weed, Michael R.; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Baig, Jamal; Horn, Thomas F W; Dailey, Peter J.; Bischofberger, Norbert; Henriksen, Steven J.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 106, No. 1, 07.2000, p. 37-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fox, HS, Weed, MR, Huitron-Resendiz, S, Baig, J, Horn, TFW, Dailey, PJ, Bischofberger, N & Henriksen, SJ 2000, 'Antiviral treatment normalizes neurophysiological but not movement abnormalities in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 106, no. 1, pp. 37-45.
Fox, Howard S. ; Weed, Michael R. ; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador ; Baig, Jamal ; Horn, Thomas F W ; Dailey, Peter J. ; Bischofberger, Norbert ; Henriksen, Steven J. / Antiviral treatment normalizes neurophysiological but not movement abnormalities in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2000 ; Vol. 106, No. 1. pp. 37-45.
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