Antiretroviral therapy-induced changes in plasma lipids and the risk of kidney dysfunction in HIV-infected men

Alison G. Abraham, Xiuhong Li, Lisa P. Jacobson, Michelle M. Estrella, Rhobert W. Evans, Mallory D. Witt, John Phair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the context of HIV, the initiation of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been found to increase the risk of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals, and dyslipidemia has been found to be a risk factor for kidney disease in the general population. Therefore, we examined changes in lipid profiles in HIV-infected men following ART initiation and the association with future kidney dysfunction. HIV-infected men from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study initiating ART between December 31, 1995 and September 30, 2011 with measured lipid and serum creatinine values pre-ART and post-ART were selected. The associations between changes in total cholesterol or high-density lipoprotein following ART initiation and the estimated change in glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over time were assessed using piecewise linear mixed effects models. There were 365 HIV-infected men who contributed to the analysis. In the adjusted models, at 3 years post-ART, those with changes in total cholesterol >50 mg/dl had an average decrease in eGFR of 2.6 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year (p<0.001) and at 5 years post-ART, the average decrease was 2.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year (p=0.008). This decline contrasted with the estimates for those with changes in total cholesterol ≤50 mg/dl: 1.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 decrease per year (p<0.001) and 0.1 ml/min/1.73 m2 decrease per year (p=0.594) for the same time periods, respectively. Large decreases in high-density lipoprotein (a decline of greater than 5 mg/dl) were not associated with declines in eGFR. These results indicate that large ART-related increases in total cholesterol may be a risk factor for kidney function decline in HIV-infected men. Should these results be generalizable to the broader HIV population, monitoring cholesterol changes following the initiation of ART may be important in identifying HIV-infected persons at risk for kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1346-1352
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS research and human retroviruses
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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