Antioxidant intake and cognitive function of elderly men and women: The Cache County study

H. J. Wengreen, R. G. Munger, C. D. Corcoran, Peter P Zandi, K. M. Hayden, M. Fotuhi, I. Skoog, M. C. Norton, J. Tschanz, John C.S. Breitner, K. A. Welsh-Bohmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We prospectively examined associations between intakes of antioxidants (vitamins C, vitamin E, and carotene) and cognitive function and decline among elderly men and women of the Cache County Study on Memory and Aging in Utah. Participants and Design: In 1995, 3831 residents 65 years of age or older completed a baseline survey that included a food frequency questionnaire and cognitive assessment. Cognitive function was assessed using an adapted version of the Modified Mini-Mental State examination (3MS) at baseline and at three subsequent follow-up interviews spanning approximately 7 years. Multivariable-mixed models were used to estimate antioxidant nutrient effects on average 3MS score over time. Results: Increasing quartiles of vitamin C intake alone and combined with vitamin E were associated with higher baseline average 3MS scores (p-trend = 0.013 and 0.02 respectively); this association appeared stronger for food sources compared to supplement or food and supplement sources combined. Study participants with lower levels of intake of vitamin C, vitamin E and carotene had a greater acceleration of the rate of 3MS decline over time compared to those with higher levels of intake. Conclusion: High antioxidant intake from food and supplement sources of vitamin C, vitamin E, and carotene may delay cognitive decline in the elderly. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-237
Number of pages8
JournalThe journal of nutrition, health & aging
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Vitamin E
cognition
Cognition
Ascorbic Acid
vitamin E
Carotenoids
carotenes
Antioxidants
ascorbic acid
antioxidants
Dietary Supplements
Food
food frequency questionnaires
interviews
Interviews
nutrition
Health
nutrients
Cognitive Dysfunction
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Cognition
  • Dementia-prevention
  • Elderly

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Aging
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science

Cite this

Wengreen, H. J., Munger, R. G., Corcoran, C. D., Zandi, P. P., Hayden, K. M., Fotuhi, M., ... Welsh-Bohmer, K. A. (2007). Antioxidant intake and cognitive function of elderly men and women: The Cache County study. The journal of nutrition, health & aging, 11(3), 230-237.

Antioxidant intake and cognitive function of elderly men and women : The Cache County study. / Wengreen, H. J.; Munger, R. G.; Corcoran, C. D.; Zandi, Peter P; Hayden, K. M.; Fotuhi, M.; Skoog, I.; Norton, M. C.; Tschanz, J.; Breitner, John C.S.; Welsh-Bohmer, K. A.

In: The journal of nutrition, health & aging, Vol. 11, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 230-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wengreen, HJ, Munger, RG, Corcoran, CD, Zandi, PP, Hayden, KM, Fotuhi, M, Skoog, I, Norton, MC, Tschanz, J, Breitner, JCS & Welsh-Bohmer, KA 2007, 'Antioxidant intake and cognitive function of elderly men and women: The Cache County study', The journal of nutrition, health & aging, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 230-237.
Wengreen, H. J. ; Munger, R. G. ; Corcoran, C. D. ; Zandi, Peter P ; Hayden, K. M. ; Fotuhi, M. ; Skoog, I. ; Norton, M. C. ; Tschanz, J. ; Breitner, John C.S. ; Welsh-Bohmer, K. A. / Antioxidant intake and cognitive function of elderly men and women : The Cache County study. In: The journal of nutrition, health & aging. 2007 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 230-237.
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