Antidepressant use in 27 European countries: Associations with sociodemographic, cultural and economic factors

Dan Lewer, Claire O'Reilly, Ramin Mojtabai, Sara Evans-Lacko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Prescribing of antidepressants varies widely between European countries despite no evidence of difference in the prevalence of affective disorders. Aims To investigate associations between the use of antidepressants, country-level spending on healthcare and country-level attitudes towards mental health problems. Method We used Eurobarometer 2010, a large general population survey from 27 European countries, to measure antidepressant use and regularity of use. We then analysed the associations with country-level spending on healthcare and country-level attitudes towards mental health problems. Results Higher country spending on healthcare was strongly associated with regular use of antidepressants. Beliefs that mentally ill people are 'dangerous' were associated with higher use, and beliefs that they 'never recover' or 'have themselves to blame' were associated with lower and less regular use of antidepressants. Conclusions Contextual factors, such as healthcare spending and public attitudes towards mental illness, may partly explain variations in antidepressant use and regular use of these medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-226
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume207
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Antidepressive Agents
Economics
Delivery of Health Care
Mental Health
Mentally Ill Persons
Mood Disorders
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Antidepressant use in 27 European countries : Associations with sociodemographic, cultural and economic factors. / Lewer, Dan; O'Reilly, Claire; Mojtabai, Ramin; Evans-Lacko, Sara.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 207, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 221-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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