Anti-inflammatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The innate, unspecific immune response to bacterial and fungal infection is mediated primarily by neutrophilic granulocytes. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), an endogenous hematopoietic growth factor for neutrophils produced at the site of infection, is an integral part of this natural host defense. However, neutrophilic granulocytes also play a major role in the inflammatory response, resulting in tissue damage. Therefore, the indications for colony-stimulating factors in combating infectious diseases seemed to be limited for fear of their proinflammatory activity. In contrast to these concerns, G-CSF has proven itself to be an anti-inflammatory immunomodulator. Animal, volunteer, and patient studies have all shown that G-CSF reduces inflammatory activity by inhibiting the production or activity of the main inflammatory mediators interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon gamma. In conclusion, the body's G-CSF-regulated emergency recruitment of neutrophils is combined with a simultaneous limitation of the harmful inflammatory reaction. This unique pharmacologic combination of improving anti-infectious defense and inhibiting inflammation, opens up a range of new indications for G-CSF in the area of nonneutropenic infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-225
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Hematology
Volume5
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Granulocytes
Colony-Stimulating Factors
Neutrophil Infiltration
Mycoses
Immunologic Factors
Infection
Interleukin-1
Bacterial Infections
Innate Immunity
Interferon-gamma
Fear
Communicable Diseases
Volunteers
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Neutrophils
Emergencies
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Anti-inflammatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. / Hartung, Thomas.

In: Current Opinion in Hematology, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1998, p. 221-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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