Anti-G protein antibody responses to respiratory syncytial virus infection or vaccination are associated with inhibition of G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 binding and leukocyte chemotaxis

Jennifer L. Harcourt, Ruth A. Karron, Ralph A. Tripp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in infants and the elderly. Presently, no safe and efficacious RSV vaccine exists; however, advances in our understanding of immunity and the pathogenesis of disease associated with RSV infection may lead to new vaccine strategies. RSV G protein contains a CX3C chemokine motif that interacts with the CX3CR1 chemokine receptor and modifies the activities of fractalkine. In the present study, we show that anti-RSV G protein antibody responses after recent RSV infection or vaccination are associated with inhibition of RSV G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 interaction and RSV G protein-mediated leukocyte chemotaxis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1936-1940
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume190
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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