Anti-G protein antibody responses to respiratory syncytial virus infection or vaccination are associated with inhibition of G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 binding and leukocyte chemotaxis

Jennifer L. Harcourt, Ruth A. Karron, Ralph A. Tripp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in infants and the elderly. Presently, no safe and efficacious RSV vaccine exists; however, advances in our understanding of immunity and the pathogenesis of disease associated with RSV infection may lead to new vaccine strategies. RSV G protein contains a CX3C chemokine motif that interacts with the CX3CR1 chemokine receptor and modifies the activities of fractalkine. In the present study, we show that anti-RSV G protein antibody responses after recent RSV infection or vaccination are associated with inhibition of RSV G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 interaction and RSV G protein-mediated leukocyte chemotaxis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1936-1940
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume190
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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