Antecedent longitudinal changes in body mass index are associated with diurnal cortisol curve features: The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis

Joshua J. Joseph, Xu Wang, Ana V. Diez Roux, Brisa N. Sanchez, Teresa E. Seeman, Belinda L. Needham, Sherita Hill Golden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context Prior studies have shown a cross-sectional association between body mass index (BMI) and salivary diurnal cortisol profile features (cortisol features); however, to our knowledge prior population-based studies have not examined the longitudinal association of body-mass index (BMI) with cortisol features. Objective To examine the association of (1) prior annual BMI percent change over 7 years with cortisol features, (2) baseline cortisol features with subsequent change in BMI over 6 years and (3) the association of change in cortisol features with change in BMI over 6 years. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Stress I & II Studies (2004–2006 & 2010–2012). Participants 1685 ethnically diverse men and women attended either MESA Stress exam (mean age 65 ± 10 years at MESA Stress I; mean age 69 ± 9 years at MESA Stress II). Outcome Measures Log-transformed cortisol features including wake-up cortisol, cortisol awakening response, early decline slope (30 min to 2 h post-awakening), late decline slope (2 h post-awakening to bedtime), bedtime, and total area under the curve (AUC) cortisol. Results Over 7 years, following multivariable adjustment, (1) a 1% higher prior annual BMI % increase was associated with a 2.9% (95% CI: − 5.0%, − 0.8%) and 3.0% (95% CI: − 4.7%, − 1.4%) lower current wake-up and total AUC cortisol, respectively; (2) there was no significant association between baseline cortisol features and subsequent change in BMI and (3) among participants with BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, flattening of the late decline slope was associated with increases in BMI (every 1-unit increase late decline slope were associated with a 12.9% increase (95%CI: − 1%, 26.8%) in BMI, respectively). Conclusions We found a significant association between prior annual BMI % change and cortisol features, but no significant association between baseline cortisol features and subsequent change in BMI. In participants with obesity increases in BMI were associated with less pronounced declined. Collectively, our results suggest that greater adiposity may lead to a blunted diurnal cortisol profile.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-107
Number of pages13
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Hydrocortisone
Body Mass Index
Atherosclerosis
Area Under Curve
Social Adjustment
Adiposity
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Longitudinal Studies
Obesity
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Cortisol
  • Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Adrenal axis
  • Obesity
  • Waist circumference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Antecedent longitudinal changes in body mass index are associated with diurnal cortisol curve features : The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. / Joseph, Joshua J.; Wang, Xu; Diez Roux, Ana V.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Needham, Belinda L.; Golden, Sherita Hill.

In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 68, 01.03.2017, p. 95-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Joseph, Joshua J.; Wang, Xu; Diez Roux, Ana V.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Needham, Belinda L.; Golden, Sherita Hill / Antecedent longitudinal changes in body mass index are associated with diurnal cortisol curve features : The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 68, 01.03.2017, p. 95-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Joseph,Joshua J.

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AU - Needham,Belinda L.

AU - Golden,Sherita Hill

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N2 - Context Prior studies have shown a cross-sectional association between body mass index (BMI) and salivary diurnal cortisol profile features (cortisol features); however, to our knowledge prior population-based studies have not examined the longitudinal association of body-mass index (BMI) with cortisol features. Objective To examine the association of (1) prior annual BMI percent change over 7 years with cortisol features, (2) baseline cortisol features with subsequent change in BMI over 6 years and (3) the association of change in cortisol features with change in BMI over 6 years. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Stress I & II Studies (2004–2006 & 2010–2012). Participants 1685 ethnically diverse men and women attended either MESA Stress exam (mean age 65 ± 10 years at MESA Stress I; mean age 69 ± 9 years at MESA Stress II). Outcome Measures Log-transformed cortisol features including wake-up cortisol, cortisol awakening response, early decline slope (30 min to 2 h post-awakening), late decline slope (2 h post-awakening to bedtime), bedtime, and total area under the curve (AUC) cortisol. Results Over 7 years, following multivariable adjustment, (1) a 1% higher prior annual BMI % increase was associated with a 2.9% (95% CI: − 5.0%, − 0.8%) and 3.0% (95% CI: − 4.7%, − 1.4%) lower current wake-up and total AUC cortisol, respectively; (2) there was no significant association between baseline cortisol features and subsequent change in BMI and (3) among participants with BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, flattening of the late decline slope was associated with increases in BMI (every 1-unit increase late decline slope were associated with a 12.9% increase (95%CI: − 1%, 26.8%) in BMI, respectively). Conclusions We found a significant association between prior annual BMI % change and cortisol features, but no significant association between baseline cortisol features and subsequent change in BMI. In participants with obesity increases in BMI were associated with less pronounced declined. Collectively, our results suggest that greater adiposity may lead to a blunted diurnal cortisol profile.

AB - Context Prior studies have shown a cross-sectional association between body mass index (BMI) and salivary diurnal cortisol profile features (cortisol features); however, to our knowledge prior population-based studies have not examined the longitudinal association of body-mass index (BMI) with cortisol features. Objective To examine the association of (1) prior annual BMI percent change over 7 years with cortisol features, (2) baseline cortisol features with subsequent change in BMI over 6 years and (3) the association of change in cortisol features with change in BMI over 6 years. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Stress I & II Studies (2004–2006 & 2010–2012). Participants 1685 ethnically diverse men and women attended either MESA Stress exam (mean age 65 ± 10 years at MESA Stress I; mean age 69 ± 9 years at MESA Stress II). Outcome Measures Log-transformed cortisol features including wake-up cortisol, cortisol awakening response, early decline slope (30 min to 2 h post-awakening), late decline slope (2 h post-awakening to bedtime), bedtime, and total area under the curve (AUC) cortisol. Results Over 7 years, following multivariable adjustment, (1) a 1% higher prior annual BMI % increase was associated with a 2.9% (95% CI: − 5.0%, − 0.8%) and 3.0% (95% CI: − 4.7%, − 1.4%) lower current wake-up and total AUC cortisol, respectively; (2) there was no significant association between baseline cortisol features and subsequent change in BMI and (3) among participants with BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, flattening of the late decline slope was associated with increases in BMI (every 1-unit increase late decline slope were associated with a 12.9% increase (95%CI: − 1%, 26.8%) in BMI, respectively). Conclusions We found a significant association between prior annual BMI % change and cortisol features, but no significant association between baseline cortisol features and subsequent change in BMI. In participants with obesity increases in BMI were associated with less pronounced declined. Collectively, our results suggest that greater adiposity may lead to a blunted diurnal cortisol profile.

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