Anomalous subcortical morphology in boys, but not girls, with ADHD compared to typically developing controls and correlates with emotion dysregulation

Karen E. Seymour, Xiaoying Tang, Deana Crocetti, Stewart H. Mostofsky, Michael I. Miller, Keri S. Rosch

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

There has been limited investigation of volume and shape difference in subcortical structures in children with ADHD and a paucity of examination of the influence of sex on these findings. The objective of this study was to examine morphology (volume and shape) of subcortical structures and their association with emotion dysregulation (ED) in girls and boys with ADHD as compared to their typically-developing (TD) counterparts. Participants included 218 children ages 8–12 years old with and without DSM-IV ADHD. Structural magnetic resonance images were obtained, and shape analyses were conducted using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM). Compared to TD boys, boys with ADHD showed reduced volumes in the bilateral globus pallidus and amygdala. There were no volumetric differences in any structure between ADHD and TD girls. Shape analysis revealed localized compressions within the globus pallidus, putamen and amygdala in ADHD boys relative to TD boys, as well as significant correlations between increased ED and unique subregion expansion in right globus pallidus, putamen, and right amygdala. Our findings suggest a sexually dimorphic pattern of differences in subcortical structures in children with ADHD compared to TD children, and a possible neurobiological mechanism by which boys with ADHD demonstrate increased difficulties with ED.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages20-28
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume261
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2017

Fingerprint

Emotions
Globus Pallidus
Amygdala
Putamen
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Emotion
  • Emotion regulation
  • Limbic
  • Subcortical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Anomalous subcortical morphology in boys, but not girls, with ADHD compared to typically developing controls and correlates with emotion dysregulation. / Seymour, Karen E.; Tang, Xiaoying; Crocetti, Deana; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Miller, Michael I.; Rosch, Keri S.

In: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging, Vol. 261, 30.03.2017, p. 20-28.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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