Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus

Philippe Gailloud, D. San Millan Ruiz, M. Muster, K. J. Murphy, J. H D Fasel, D. A. Rufenacht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The laterocavernous sinus (LCS) has recently been recognized as one of the major drainage pathways of the superficial middle cerebral vein (SMCV). Our purpose was to investigate the drainage pattern of the SMCV, with special emphasis on the angiographic anatomy of the LCS. METHODS: The drainage pathways of the SMCV were evaluated prospectively on 100 selective carotid angiograms obtained in 65 consecutive patients. RESULTS: The SMCV was absent in 19% of cases. A classic termination into the cavernous sinus (CS) was found in 20%, a paracavernous sinus in 39%, and an LCS in 22%. The LCS drained toward the pterygoid plexus (27%), the superior petrosal sinus (18%), the posterior aspect of the CS (32%), or a combination of these pathways (23%). A complete absence of connection between the LCS and CS was observed in 63.5% of the patients. CONCLUSION: The LCS is a laterosellar venous space that is anatomically and angiographically distinct from the CS. Secondary small anastomoses between the LCS and CS may make it difficult to differentiate the two structures. Appreciation of the course and connection pattern of the LCS is important, particularly when planning an endovascular approach to treatment of lesions in the region of the CS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1923-1929
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume21
Issue number10
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Cavernous Sinus
Cerebral Veins
Anatomy
Drainage
Angiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Gailloud, P., San Millan Ruiz, D., Muster, M., Murphy, K. J., Fasel, J. H. D., & Rufenacht, D. A. (2000). Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus. American Journal of Neuroradiology, 21(10), 1923-1929.

Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus. / Gailloud, Philippe; San Millan Ruiz, D.; Muster, M.; Murphy, K. J.; Fasel, J. H D; Rufenacht, D. A.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 21, No. 10, 2000, p. 1923-1929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gailloud, P, San Millan Ruiz, D, Muster, M, Murphy, KJ, Fasel, JHD & Rufenacht, DA 2000, 'Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus', American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 21, no. 10, pp. 1923-1929.
Gailloud P, San Millan Ruiz D, Muster M, Murphy KJ, Fasel JHD, Rufenacht DA. Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus. American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2000;21(10):1923-1929.
Gailloud, Philippe ; San Millan Ruiz, D. ; Muster, M. ; Murphy, K. J. ; Fasel, J. H D ; Rufenacht, D. A. / Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 10. pp. 1923-1929.
@article{d00a57d7985944289740e5b1a7d73a0a,
title = "Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The laterocavernous sinus (LCS) has recently been recognized as one of the major drainage pathways of the superficial middle cerebral vein (SMCV). Our purpose was to investigate the drainage pattern of the SMCV, with special emphasis on the angiographic anatomy of the LCS. METHODS: The drainage pathways of the SMCV were evaluated prospectively on 100 selective carotid angiograms obtained in 65 consecutive patients. RESULTS: The SMCV was absent in 19{\%} of cases. A classic termination into the cavernous sinus (CS) was found in 20{\%}, a paracavernous sinus in 39{\%}, and an LCS in 22{\%}. The LCS drained toward the pterygoid plexus (27{\%}), the superior petrosal sinus (18{\%}), the posterior aspect of the CS (32{\%}), or a combination of these pathways (23{\%}). A complete absence of connection between the LCS and CS was observed in 63.5{\%} of the patients. CONCLUSION: The LCS is a laterosellar venous space that is anatomically and angiographically distinct from the CS. Secondary small anastomoses between the LCS and CS may make it difficult to differentiate the two structures. Appreciation of the course and connection pattern of the LCS is important, particularly when planning an endovascular approach to treatment of lesions in the region of the CS.",
author = "Philippe Gailloud and {San Millan Ruiz}, D. and M. Muster and Murphy, {K. J.} and Fasel, {J. H D} and Rufenacht, {D. A.}",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "1923--1929",
journal = "American Journal of Neuroradiology",
issn = "0195-6108",
publisher = "American Society of Neuroradiology",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Angiographic anatomy of the laterocavernous sinus

AU - Gailloud, Philippe

AU - San Millan Ruiz, D.

AU - Muster, M.

AU - Murphy, K. J.

AU - Fasel, J. H D

AU - Rufenacht, D. A.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The laterocavernous sinus (LCS) has recently been recognized as one of the major drainage pathways of the superficial middle cerebral vein (SMCV). Our purpose was to investigate the drainage pattern of the SMCV, with special emphasis on the angiographic anatomy of the LCS. METHODS: The drainage pathways of the SMCV were evaluated prospectively on 100 selective carotid angiograms obtained in 65 consecutive patients. RESULTS: The SMCV was absent in 19% of cases. A classic termination into the cavernous sinus (CS) was found in 20%, a paracavernous sinus in 39%, and an LCS in 22%. The LCS drained toward the pterygoid plexus (27%), the superior petrosal sinus (18%), the posterior aspect of the CS (32%), or a combination of these pathways (23%). A complete absence of connection between the LCS and CS was observed in 63.5% of the patients. CONCLUSION: The LCS is a laterosellar venous space that is anatomically and angiographically distinct from the CS. Secondary small anastomoses between the LCS and CS may make it difficult to differentiate the two structures. Appreciation of the course and connection pattern of the LCS is important, particularly when planning an endovascular approach to treatment of lesions in the region of the CS.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The laterocavernous sinus (LCS) has recently been recognized as one of the major drainage pathways of the superficial middle cerebral vein (SMCV). Our purpose was to investigate the drainage pattern of the SMCV, with special emphasis on the angiographic anatomy of the LCS. METHODS: The drainage pathways of the SMCV were evaluated prospectively on 100 selective carotid angiograms obtained in 65 consecutive patients. RESULTS: The SMCV was absent in 19% of cases. A classic termination into the cavernous sinus (CS) was found in 20%, a paracavernous sinus in 39%, and an LCS in 22%. The LCS drained toward the pterygoid plexus (27%), the superior petrosal sinus (18%), the posterior aspect of the CS (32%), or a combination of these pathways (23%). A complete absence of connection between the LCS and CS was observed in 63.5% of the patients. CONCLUSION: The LCS is a laterosellar venous space that is anatomically and angiographically distinct from the CS. Secondary small anastomoses between the LCS and CS may make it difficult to differentiate the two structures. Appreciation of the course and connection pattern of the LCS is important, particularly when planning an endovascular approach to treatment of lesions in the region of the CS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033740038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033740038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11110548

AN - SCOPUS:0033740038

VL - 21

SP - 1923

EP - 1929

JO - American Journal of Neuroradiology

JF - American Journal of Neuroradiology

SN - 0195-6108

IS - 10

ER -