Aneurysm treatment practice patterns for newly appointed dual-trained cerebrovascular/endovascular neurosurgeons: Comparison of open surgical to neuroendovascular procedures in the first 2 years of academic practice

Bowen Jiang, Matthew Bender, Bima Hasjim, Frank Hsu, Rafael Tamargo, Judy Huang, Geoffrey Colby, Alexander Coon, Li Mei Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The practice patterns of a hybrid open cerebrovascular/neuroendovascular (CVNV) neurosurgeon in early academic practice is unknown. Methods: We performed a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of patients with cerebral aneurysms that were treated within the first 24 months of the neurosurgeon's practice. Results: A total of 533 aneurysms were treated by the three senior authors within the first 24 months of their academic practice. Of these aneurysms, 172 were treated with microsurgical clipping, 191 with coiling, and 170 with flow diversion. Treatment in the setting of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurred in 23% (122/533) of the aneurysms. Majority of the clipped aneurysms (70%, 121/172) were anterior cerebral artery (ACA), anterior communicating artery (ACOM), or middle cerebral artery (MCA) in location. In comparison, only 23% (82/361) of aneurysms treated with coiling or flow diversion therapy were ACA, ACOM, or MCA in location (P < 0.05). Additionally, majority of the flow diverted aneurysm (65%, 111/170) were cavernous or ophthalmic/paraophthalmic in location. During the second year of practice, there appeared to be a trend towards more aneurysms treated with neuroendovascular techniques (22% increase), particularly in flow diversion. Conclusion: Although the CVNV neurosurgeon treats cerebral aneurysms more commonly with neuroendovascular techniques, a third of the cerebral aneurysms are still selected for microsurgical clipping. Aneurysms located along the ACA/ACOM or MCA are the most frequent aneurysms reserved for microsurgical clipping. The CVNV neurosurgeon must be prepared to manage a high percentage of ACA/ACOM or MCA aneurysms microsurgically.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number154
JournalSurgical Neurology International
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Aneurysm
  • clipping
  • coiling
  • endovascular
  • flow diversion
  • hybrid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Aneurysm treatment practice patterns for newly appointed dual-trained cerebrovascular/endovascular neurosurgeons: Comparison of open surgical to neuroendovascular procedures in the first 2 years of academic practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this