Anesthetic implications of the addition of an operative robot for endoscopic surgery: A case report

K. Gage Parr, Mark A. Talamini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly popular over the last decade. However, this surgical technique has a number of limitations. It is difficult to work in a three-dimensional space while viewing a two-dimensional monitor, long instruments amplify natural tremor, and traditional instruments have limited mobility due to few degrees of freedom. Robot-assisted surgery has been developed in response to these limitations. A three-dimensional viewer allows the surgeon to operate in a realistic environment, natural tremor is eliminated by translating the surgeon's hand motions to robotic movements, and the robotic surgical instruments are designed to have the same dexterity as a human wrist. We describe a case of robot-assisted laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and discuss the anesthetic issues associated with this new surgical technique. In addition to the anesthetic issues associated with traditional laparoscopic surgery, robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery presents some unique challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-233
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Laparoscopy
Anesthetics
Robotics
Tremor
Fundoplication
Wrist
Surgical Instruments
Hand
Surgeons

Keywords

  • Patient safety
  • Robotic assisted surgery
  • Tele-surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Anesthetic implications of the addition of an operative robot for endoscopic surgery : A case report. / Parr, K. Gage; Talamini, Mark A.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2002, p. 228-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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