Anatomic variations in the cortex: individual differences and the problem of the localization of language functions

H. A. Whitaker, O. A. Selnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The controversy concerning the localization of brain functions, particularly speech and language, is well known. The overwhelming statistical support for the classical position has been challenged from a number of points of view: contradictory case histories, limitations of the behavioral analysis, difficulties inherent in localizing lesions, and behavioral instabilities of patients with central nervous system disease. With rare exceptions, individual anatomic variations in brain vrain have not been considered in this context, which is somewhat surprising in view of the recent surge of interest in interhemispheric asymmetries of the brain. From a review of the literature, the conclusion seems inescapable that each person's brain may be as individual as his physiognomy. This conclusion should come as no surprise if one extrapolates from the large number of animal studies which suggest that the biochemical and morphological structure of the brain is modified by experience, since clearly, no two individuals share an identical set of experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)844-856
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
VolumeVol. 280
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Anatomic Variation
Individuality
Brain
Language
Physiognomy
Central Nervous System Diseases
Neurology
Animals
Individual Differences
Functions of Language
Localization
Cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Anatomic variations in the cortex : individual differences and the problem of the localization of language functions. / Whitaker, H. A.; Selnes, O. A.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. Vol. 280, 1976, p. 844-856.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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