Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus

A. M. Lake, K. J. Bloch, K. J. Sinclair, W. A. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effect of intestinal anaphylaxis on goblet cell mucus release was tested in rats immunized with small doses of egg albumin and alum and challenged intraduodenally with antigen. The alteration in vascular and mucosal permeability which accompanies intestinal anaphylaxis was reflected by increased retention of 125I-labelled rat serum albumin in gut wall segments and increased amounts of protein-bound radioactivity in the intestinal secretion from the segments. Intestinal goblet cell mucus was labelled in vivo with 35S. Infusion of antigen, into the duodenum of activity immunized rats led to the appearance of 35S-labelled high molecular weight glycoprotein, presumably of goblet cell origin, in the intestinal secretions. Goblet cell mucus release was dependent on the dose of antigen infused, was antigen-specific and was inhibited by pretreatment of rats with cyproheptidine. Enhanced release of goblet cell mucus was observed in normal rats prepared by intravenous injection of rat antiserum rich in IgE anti-egg albumin antibodies and challenged by intraduodenal infusion of antigen. Prior heating of the antiserum inhibited passive transfer of the reaction; this finding is consistent with the heat lability of IgE antibodies. The latter class of antibodies are presumed to be responsible for intestinal anaphylaxis and its associated mucus release in the model system examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-178
Number of pages6
JournalImmunology
Volume39
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Goblet Cells
Mucus
Antigens
Anaphylaxis
Intestinal Secretions
Ovum
Immune Sera
Albumins
Antibodies
Immunoglobulin Isotypes
Capillary Permeability
Duodenum
Serum Albumin
Intravenous Injections
Heating
Radioactivity
Immunoglobulin E
Glycoproteins
Hot Temperature
Molecular Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Lake, A. M., Bloch, K. J., Sinclair, K. J., & Walker, W. A. (1980). Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus. Immunology, 39(2), 173-178.

Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus. / Lake, A. M.; Bloch, K. J.; Sinclair, K. J.; Walker, W. A.

In: Immunology, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.01.1980, p. 173-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lake, AM, Bloch, KJ, Sinclair, KJ & Walker, WA 1980, 'Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus', Immunology, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 173-178.
Lake AM, Bloch KJ, Sinclair KJ, Walker WA. Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus. Immunology. 1980 Jan 1;39(2):173-178.
Lake, A. M. ; Bloch, K. J. ; Sinclair, K. J. ; Walker, W. A. / Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus. In: Immunology. 1980 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 173-178.
@article{69acf345dc7b44e1a514088ceb3699d9,
title = "Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus",
abstract = "The effect of intestinal anaphylaxis on goblet cell mucus release was tested in rats immunized with small doses of egg albumin and alum and challenged intraduodenally with antigen. The alteration in vascular and mucosal permeability which accompanies intestinal anaphylaxis was reflected by increased retention of 125I-labelled rat serum albumin in gut wall segments and increased amounts of protein-bound radioactivity in the intestinal secretion from the segments. Intestinal goblet cell mucus was labelled in vivo with 35S. Infusion of antigen, into the duodenum of activity immunized rats led to the appearance of 35S-labelled high molecular weight glycoprotein, presumably of goblet cell origin, in the intestinal secretions. Goblet cell mucus release was dependent on the dose of antigen infused, was antigen-specific and was inhibited by pretreatment of rats with cyproheptidine. Enhanced release of goblet cell mucus was observed in normal rats prepared by intravenous injection of rat antiserum rich in IgE anti-egg albumin antibodies and challenged by intraduodenal infusion of antigen. Prior heating of the antiserum inhibited passive transfer of the reaction; this finding is consistent with the heat lability of IgE antibodies. The latter class of antibodies are presumed to be responsible for intestinal anaphylaxis and its associated mucus release in the model system examined.",
author = "Lake, {A. M.} and Bloch, {K. J.} and Sinclair, {K. J.} and Walker, {W. A.}",
year = "1980",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "173--178",
journal = "Immunology",
issn = "0019-2805",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus

AU - Lake, A. M.

AU - Bloch, K. J.

AU - Sinclair, K. J.

AU - Walker, W. A.

PY - 1980/1/1

Y1 - 1980/1/1

N2 - The effect of intestinal anaphylaxis on goblet cell mucus release was tested in rats immunized with small doses of egg albumin and alum and challenged intraduodenally with antigen. The alteration in vascular and mucosal permeability which accompanies intestinal anaphylaxis was reflected by increased retention of 125I-labelled rat serum albumin in gut wall segments and increased amounts of protein-bound radioactivity in the intestinal secretion from the segments. Intestinal goblet cell mucus was labelled in vivo with 35S. Infusion of antigen, into the duodenum of activity immunized rats led to the appearance of 35S-labelled high molecular weight glycoprotein, presumably of goblet cell origin, in the intestinal secretions. Goblet cell mucus release was dependent on the dose of antigen infused, was antigen-specific and was inhibited by pretreatment of rats with cyproheptidine. Enhanced release of goblet cell mucus was observed in normal rats prepared by intravenous injection of rat antiserum rich in IgE anti-egg albumin antibodies and challenged by intraduodenal infusion of antigen. Prior heating of the antiserum inhibited passive transfer of the reaction; this finding is consistent with the heat lability of IgE antibodies. The latter class of antibodies are presumed to be responsible for intestinal anaphylaxis and its associated mucus release in the model system examined.

AB - The effect of intestinal anaphylaxis on goblet cell mucus release was tested in rats immunized with small doses of egg albumin and alum and challenged intraduodenally with antigen. The alteration in vascular and mucosal permeability which accompanies intestinal anaphylaxis was reflected by increased retention of 125I-labelled rat serum albumin in gut wall segments and increased amounts of protein-bound radioactivity in the intestinal secretion from the segments. Intestinal goblet cell mucus was labelled in vivo with 35S. Infusion of antigen, into the duodenum of activity immunized rats led to the appearance of 35S-labelled high molecular weight glycoprotein, presumably of goblet cell origin, in the intestinal secretions. Goblet cell mucus release was dependent on the dose of antigen infused, was antigen-specific and was inhibited by pretreatment of rats with cyproheptidine. Enhanced release of goblet cell mucus was observed in normal rats prepared by intravenous injection of rat antiserum rich in IgE anti-egg albumin antibodies and challenged by intraduodenal infusion of antigen. Prior heating of the antiserum inhibited passive transfer of the reaction; this finding is consistent with the heat lability of IgE antibodies. The latter class of antibodies are presumed to be responsible for intestinal anaphylaxis and its associated mucus release in the model system examined.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018821528&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018821528&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7380466

AN - SCOPUS:0018821528

VL - 39

SP - 173

EP - 178

JO - Immunology

JF - Immunology

SN - 0019-2805

IS - 2

ER -