Analysis of water saturation, napl content, degradation half-life, and lower boundary conditions on voc transport modeling: Implications for closure of soil venting systems

Dominic C. DiGiulio, Ravi Varadhan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Simulations using a one-dimensional, analytical, vadose zone, solute-transport screening code (VFLUX) were conducted to assess the effect of water saturation, NAPL saturation, degradation half-life, and boundary conditions at the vadose zone/groundwater interface on model output. At high initial soil concentrations, model output was significantly affected by input parameters and lower boundary conditions yet still resulted in consistent decision-making to initiate or continue venting application. At lower soil concentrations, however, typical of what is observed after prolonged venting application, differences in model input and selection of lower boundary conditions resulted in inconsistent decision-making. Specifically, under conditions of low water saturation, use of a first-type, time-dependent lower boundary condition indicated that the primary direction of mass flux was from ground water to the vadose-zone, suggesting little benefit from continued venting application. Use indicate continued mass flux from the vadose zone to ground water, suggesting a continued need for venting application. In this situation, sensitivity analysis of input parameters, selection of boundary conditions, and consideration of overall objectives in vadose zone modeling become critical in regulatory decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-91
Number of pages9
JournalGround Water Monitoring and Remediation
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Analysis of water saturation, napl content, degradation half-life, and lower boundary conditions on voc transport modeling: Implications for closure of soil venting systems'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this