Analysis of suture manipulation forces for teleoperation with force feedback

Masaya Kitagawa, Allison M. Okamura, Brian T. Bethea, Vincent L. Gott, William A. Baumgartner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Despite many successes with teleoperated robotic surgical systems, some surgeons feel that the lack of haptic (force or tactile) feedback is detrimental in applications requiring fine suture manipulation. In this paper, we study the difference between applied suture forces in three knot tying exercises: hand ties, instrument ties (using needle drivers), and robot ties (using the da Vinci™ Surgical System from Intuitive Surgical, Inc.). Both instrument and robot-assisted ties differ from hand ties in accuracy of applied force. However, only the robot ties differ from hand ties in repeatability of applied force. Furthermore, comparison between attendings and residents revealed statistically significant differences in the forces used during hand ties, although attendings and residents perform similarly when comparing instrument and robot ties to hand ties. These results indicate that resolved force feedback would improve robot-assisted performance during complex surgical tasks such as knot tying with fine suture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention - MICCAI 2002 - 5th International Conference, Proceedings
EditorsTakeyoshi Dohi, Ron Kikinis
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages155-162
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9783540457862
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Event5th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2002 - Tokyo, Japan
Duration: Sep 25 2002Sep 28 2002

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume2488
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other5th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2002
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityTokyo
Period9/25/029/28/02

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

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