Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viremia and provirus in resting CD4+ T cells reveals a novel source of residual viremia in patients on antiretroviral therapy

Timothy P. Brennan, John O. Woods, Ahmad R. Sedaghat, Janet M Siliciano, Robert F Siliciano, Claus O. Wilke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can reduce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viremia to clinically undetectable levels. Despite this dramatic reduction, some virus is present in the blood. In addition, a long-lived latent reservoir for HIV-1 exists in resting memory CD4+ T cells. This reservoir is believed to be a source of the residual viremia and is the focus of eradication efforts. Here, we use two measures of population structure - analysis of molecular variance and the Slatkin-Maddison test - to demonstrate that the residual viremia is genetically distinct from proviruses in resting CD4+ T cells but that proviruses in resting and activated CD4+ T cells belong to a single population. Residual viremia is genetically distinct from proviruses in activated CD4 + T cells, monocytes, and unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The finding that some of the residual viremia in patients on HAART stems from an unidentified cellular source other than CD4+ T cells has implications for eradication efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8470-8481
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume83
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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proviruses
Proviruses
Viremia
viremia
Human immunodeficiency virus 1
HIV-1
T-lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
therapeutics
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Therapeutics
mononuclear leukocytes
Molecular Structure
monocytes
Population
Monocytes
Blood Cells
Analysis of Variance
population structure
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viremia and provirus in resting CD4+ T cells reveals a novel source of residual viremia in patients on antiretroviral therapy. / Brennan, Timothy P.; Woods, John O.; Sedaghat, Ahmad R.; Siliciano, Janet M; Siliciano, Robert F; Wilke, Claus O.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 83, No. 17, 2009, p. 8470-8481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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