Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp160 sequences from a patient with HIV dementia: Evidence for monocyte trafficking into brain

Yiling Liu, Xiao Pei Tang, Justin Charles McArthur, Jason Scott, Suzanne Gartner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Towards understanding the pathogenesis of HIV dementia, we molecularly cloned and sequenced human immundeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 genes from uncultured post-mortem tissues collected from a patient with HIV dementia. Sequences from bone marrow, lymph node, lung, and four regions of brain - the deep white matter, head of caudate, choroid plexus and meninges were compared. Also included were gp160 sequences recovered from blood monocytes collected 5 months prior to death. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the sequences from deep white matter were more closely related to those from bone marrow, than to those from the other tissues, and moreover, were most closely related to sequences from the blood monocytes. These findings suggest trafficking of bone marrow-derived monocytes into the deep white matter during this late stage of infection. Another cluster included sequences from choroid plexus, meninges and lymph node, and interestingly, identical patterns of four or nine stop codons were shared among these tissues. These mutations appear to be the consequence of G→A hypermutation, and could reflect independent events, or the movement of virions or infected cells, from the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid and ultimately, into the lymph node. We propose that a critical step towards the development of HIV dementia is an increase in monocyte trafficking into the brain, and that this process is either initiated and/or accelerated during late-stage infection, which could explain why dementia occurs primarily during this time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of NeuroVirology
Volume6
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 2000

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AIDS Dementia Complex
Choroid Plexus
HIV-1
Monocytes
Meninges
Lymph Nodes
Bone Marrow
Brain
Terminator Codon
Infection
Virion
Sequence Analysis
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Dementia
Viruses
Lung
Mutation
Genes
White Matter

Keywords

  • CNS
  • Dementia
  • Gp160
  • HIV
  • Monocyte

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp160 sequences from a patient with HIV dementia : Evidence for monocyte trafficking into brain. / Liu, Yiling; Tang, Xiao Pei; McArthur, Justin Charles; Scott, Jason; Gartner, Suzanne.

In: Journal of NeuroVirology, Vol. 6, No. SUPPL. 1, 2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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