An update from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among young children in Bangladesh, July 2012 to June 2017

Syed M. Satter, Negar Aliabadi, Paul A. Gastañaduy, Warda Haque, Abdullah Mamun, Meerjady S. Flora, K. Zaman, Mustafizur Rahman, James D. Heffelfinger, Stephen P. Luby, Emily Gurley, Umesh D. Parashar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: In preparation for the introduction of a rotavirus vaccine into the routine immunization program of Bangladesh in 2018, we report data and highlight evolving genotypes from five years of active hospital-based rotavirus surveillance which began in July 2012. Methods: We enrolled and collected fresh stool from every fourth child < 5 years admitted with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) at 8 participating surveillance hospitals. Rotavirus infections were detected by enzyme immune assay. Twenty-five percent of rotavirus isolates were genotyped using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that 64% (4832/7562) of children < 5 years of age admitted with AGE had evidence of rotavirus infection. The majority (57%) of patients with rotavirus infection were <12 months of age. The most common strains were G1P[8] (43%), G12P[8] (15%) and G9P[8] (9%); 11% of children had mixed infection.G3P[8], which has not been reported in Bangladesh since 2001, was documented for the first time in our surveillance system. Conclusions: The high burden of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations highlights the potential value of rotavirus vaccination in Bangladesh. Continued surveillance is important for monitoring the impact of vaccination as well as monitoring evolving genotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVaccine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bangladesh
Rotavirus
gastroenteritis
Gastroenteritis
Rotavirus Infections
monitoring
Vaccination
Genotype
Rotavirus Vaccines
Immunization Programs
Enzyme Assays
Coinfection
Reverse Transcription
Hospitalization
vaccination
infection
Polymerase Chain Reaction
genotype
mixed infection
immunization

Keywords

  • Bangladesh
  • Hospital based surveillance
  • Rotavirus
  • Rotavirus vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Satter, S. M., Aliabadi, N., Gastañaduy, P. A., Haque, W., Mamun, A., Flora, M. S., ... Parashar, U. D. (Accepted/In press). An update from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among young children in Bangladesh, July 2012 to June 2017. Vaccine. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.05.032

An update from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among young children in Bangladesh, July 2012 to June 2017. / Satter, Syed M.; Aliabadi, Negar; Gastañaduy, Paul A.; Haque, Warda; Mamun, Abdullah; Flora, Meerjady S.; Zaman, K.; Rahman, Mustafizur; Heffelfinger, James D.; Luby, Stephen P.; Gurley, Emily; Parashar, Umesh D.

In: Vaccine, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satter, SM, Aliabadi, N, Gastañaduy, PA, Haque, W, Mamun, A, Flora, MS, Zaman, K, Rahman, M, Heffelfinger, JD, Luby, SP, Gurley, E & Parashar, UD 2018, 'An update from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among young children in Bangladesh, July 2012 to June 2017', Vaccine. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.05.032
Satter, Syed M. ; Aliabadi, Negar ; Gastañaduy, Paul A. ; Haque, Warda ; Mamun, Abdullah ; Flora, Meerjady S. ; Zaman, K. ; Rahman, Mustafizur ; Heffelfinger, James D. ; Luby, Stephen P. ; Gurley, Emily ; Parashar, Umesh D. / An update from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among young children in Bangladesh, July 2012 to June 2017. In: Vaccine. 2018.
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abstract = "Introduction: In preparation for the introduction of a rotavirus vaccine into the routine immunization program of Bangladesh in 2018, we report data and highlight evolving genotypes from five years of active hospital-based rotavirus surveillance which began in July 2012. Methods: We enrolled and collected fresh stool from every fourth child < 5 years admitted with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) at 8 participating surveillance hospitals. Rotavirus infections were detected by enzyme immune assay. Twenty-five percent of rotavirus isolates were genotyped using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that 64{\%} (4832/7562) of children < 5 years of age admitted with AGE had evidence of rotavirus infection. The majority (57{\%}) of patients with rotavirus infection were <12 months of age. The most common strains were G1P[8] (43{\%}), G12P[8] (15{\%}) and G9P[8] (9{\%}); 11{\%} of children had mixed infection.G3P[8], which has not been reported in Bangladesh since 2001, was documented for the first time in our surveillance system. Conclusions: The high burden of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations highlights the potential value of rotavirus vaccination in Bangladesh. Continued surveillance is important for monitoring the impact of vaccination as well as monitoring evolving genotypes.",
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