An outbreak of salmonellosis associated with a fatality in a healthy child: A large dose and severe illness

David N. Taylor, Cheryl Bopp, Kristin Birkness, Mitchell L. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Taylor, D. N. (CDC, Atlanta, GA 30333), C. Bopp, K. Birkness and M. L. Cohen. An outbreak of salmonellosis associated with a fatality in a healthy child: a large dose and severe illness. Am J Epidemiol 1984;119:907-12.In June 1982, an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis occurred on a farm in Wyoming. All eight affected persons became severely III 8-18 hours after they had eaten homemade ice cream. A previously healthy 13-year-old boy died 37 hours after exposure; his mother and four younger siblings were transferred to intensive care units in hospitals in adjoining states, and the remaining two adult males were hospitalized locally. Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from all eight ill persons, from the remaining ice cream, and from the family's hens whose eggs were used in the preparation of the ice cream. All Salmonella contained identical plasmids (60-, 5.6-, and 3.3-megadalton); the ice cream contained 106 salmonellae/g and, according to food histories, individuals consumed an estimated dose of between 108 and 109 organisms. The fatal illness occurred in the boy who had eaten the largest amount of ice cream (109 organisms). This report demonstrates that Salmonella can cause fatal illness in previously healthy individuals and that the incubation period and the severity of the illness may be related to the dose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)907-912
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume119
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1984

Keywords

  • Diarrhea
  • Ice cream
  • Poultry
  • Salmonella

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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