An outbreak of Campylobacter jejuni infections associated with food handler contamination: The use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

Sonja J. Olsen, Gail R. Hansen, Linda Bartlett, Collette Fitzgerald, Anais Sonder, Renu Manjrekar, Tammy Riggs, Jamie Kim, Robert Flahart, Gianfranco Pezzino, David L. Swerdlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 1998, an outbreak of Campylobacter jejuni infections occurred in Kansas among persons attending a school luncheon; community cases were also reported. In a cohort study of luncheon attendees, 27 (17%) of 161 persons reported illness. Consuming gravy (relative risk [RR], 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-11.7) or pineapple (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0-5.7) was associated with illness. Both foods were prepared in a kitchen that served 6 other schools where no illness was reported. A cafeteria worker at the luncheon had a diarrheal illness and was the likely source of the outbreak. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the isolates from the food handler and those of 8 lunch attendees were indistinguishable. Isolates from 4 community patients differed. This was the first use of PFGE in a Campylobacter outbreak in the United States; its use was critical in determining that community cases were not linked.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-167
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume183
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Olsen, S. J., Hansen, G. R., Bartlett, L., Fitzgerald, C., Sonder, A., Manjrekar, R., Riggs, T., Kim, J., Flahart, R., Pezzino, G., & Swerdlow, D. L. (2001). An outbreak of Campylobacter jejuni infections associated with food handler contamination: The use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 183(1), 164-167. https://doi.org/10.1086/317657